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Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Recount Shows Ranzau Winner In Sedgwick County Commission Race

With the recount of last week’s votes for a Sedgwick County Commission race now complete, Commissioner Richard Ranzau remains the winner of the Republican primary for the 4th District.

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Shakil Afridi, a Pakistani doctor who helped in the hunt for Osama bin Laden by trying to collect DNA from the al-Qaida leader and his family members, has been convicted of treason and sentenced to 33 years in prison, according to reports from Pakistan.

"This is definitely the big event" on Egypt's way toward its own form of democracy.

That's how NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson summed up the news earlier on Morning Edition as she reported from Cairo about the opening day of the first free presidential elections in a nation that just a little more than a year ago was in the throes of a revolution that toppled President Hosni Mubarak's regime.

Carter Andrushko is 5 years old, and he knows a few things already: He knows how to spell his name. He knows that Crusty, his hermit crab, has 10 legs. And he knows what he wants to do when he grows up: look for dinosaur bones.

According to the Utah Department of Workforce Services, however, Carter already has a job. In fact, according to that office, he's been working since before he was even born. That's what Carter's mother, Jennifer Andrushko, discovered when she applied for Medicaid in 2009 and found out that someone had been using Carter's Social Security number for years.

If you pick up a cushion from any sofa or piece of furniture that has foam, you're likely to find a small white tag that reads: "This article meets all flammability requirements of California Bureau of Home Furnishings technical bulletin 117."

The law, referred to as TB 117, was passed in California in 1975. It says that the foam inside upholstered furniture must be able to resist a flame, such as from a cigarette lighter or a candle. Rather than make different furniture just for California, big furniture makers adhere to those standards in all 50 states and even Canada.

The Olympics start in July, but American sprinter Allyson Felix is still deciding which events she'll focus on in London. She's won Olympic silver medals twice in her beloved 200 meters, a distance in which she's also a three–time world champion.

Felix won an Olympic gold in 2008, on the 4x400-meter relay team. But this time around, she wants an individual gold, too.

New Success At 100 Meters

Xerox is one of America's most venerable companies. Founded in 1906, its name is virtually synonymous with "photocopy."

But in recent years, in an era of email and paperless offices, Xerox has struggled to stay relevant. Today, the company is trying to turn itself around and thrive in the digital age.

Leading Xerox through that transformation is Ursula Burns, a woman who has undergone tremendous change in her own life. Burns, 53, grew up in New York City's Lower East Side, an area she has described as a tough, drug-infested ghetto.

Sanctions have not often worked to get governments to change their behavior, but Iran may prove to be an exception. The country depends on income from oil sales, and the oil sector is highly vulnerable to sanctions.

The United States has stopped buying Iranian oil, and the European Union is set to do so at the end of next month. There are sanctions on Iran's central bank and punishments for companies that help Iran ship its oil.

Jamie Webster, an oil market analyst at PFC Energy, says Iran's oil exports — normally about 2.5 million barrels a day — are in serious jeopardy.

European stock markets have rallied in anticipation of an informal summit of European Union leaders Wednesday in Brussels. A major policy pivot is expected to address the eurozone's debts and deficits crisis.

Up to now, European leaders have emphasized austerity, and that has cost some of them their jobs. The new approach is likely to focus on the same kind of growth President Obama has pursued in the United States — where Democrats and Republicans are drawing opposite conclusions from the euro crisis.

It's the climax of the hockey and basketball seasons, but both have potential playoff visibility problems. Let me explain.

OK, the NBA first. As you know, basketball is the most individualized, celebrity-ized team game. Like movie stars, the best players are known by their first names: LeBron, Kobe, Dirk. Every basketball superstar wants to take his talents to a hot-dog, big-time market. Or at least marry a Kardashian.

Amber Cooper and her husband were doing OK. They had jobs, a healthy 5-year-old son, a house in Riverbank, Calif., and health insurance from her job in the accounting department of a small manufacturing company.

Then one day everything changed.

"We were in a conference room ... and I had heard rumors but didn't know if it was true, and I started crying in front of everyone and actually had to excuse myself to gather myself together and go back in. It was devastating for me," Cooper said.

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Commentary

Naomi Woddis

Marginalia: S. K. Perry

Sarah Perry was longlisted for London’s Young Poet Laureate in 2013, and her experience as a poet is evident in her debut novel, Let Me Be Like Water .

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KMUW Music

Sunday, August 19

Sunday on Soulsations we remember the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin. She passed away from pancreatic cancer on August 16, 2018 at her home in Detroit. Franklin was 76 years old.

Album cover art

Wednesday, August 15

Listen for selections from new and recent releases by Tami Neilson, Horne + Holt, The Magpie Salute and a re-recording of David Bowie’s “Zeroes.”

Thursday, August 16

Released in 1993, Frosting On The Beater was the third album from Seattle power pop outfit The Posies. We’ll hear music from that collection plus selections from Columbia: Live At Missouri University, the 1993 album from the reunited Memphis band Big Star. The group’s remaining members, Jody Stephens and Alex Chilton, recruited Ken Stringfellow and Jon Auer of The Posies for what was thought to be a one-time reunion but lasted until Chilton’s death in 2010.

Friday, August 17

With their band Knest on a hiatus, guitarist Jonathan Horne and classically-trained cellist Randall Holt began experimenting with improvisational techniques. The result is Wires, their debut album, which explores the possibilities of both their respective instruments across a series of compositions that the pair see as tone poems. We’ll hear music from that release as well as selections from High And Lonesome With The Excuses, the new release from veteran singer-songwriter John Eberly and his band The Excuses.

Saturday, August 18

Listen for music from Led Zeppelin, Jeff Buckley with Gary Lucas and new music from Galen Ayers.

Monday, August 20

We celebrate the 70th birthday of vocalist Robert Plant with selections from his work with Led Zeppelin and as a solo artist. Plus music from Jimmy Page with The Black Crowes, Sam Phillips and Stone Temple Pilots.

Danny Clinch

In early 2017 Old Crow Medicine Show celebrated signing with the Columbia label by issuing a live, track-by-track re-recording of Bob Dylan's classic 1966 LP Blonde On Blonde. The band had tapped acclaimed producer Dave Cobb to helm their next studio album, but Cobb issued a specific if somewhat unusual directive to the band, which visits the Stiefel Theatre on Thursday, Aug. 16.

Robert Plant turns 70 on Monday, August 20, and Global Village and Strange Currency are teaming up to celebrate. Tune in from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. for three hours of music from Robert Plant, Led Zeppelin and other Plant projects, and notable covers. 

Monday 8.13.18

Lots of great jazz piano tonight on the Night Train as we mark birthdays of George Shearing and Mulgrew Miller, and get to new releases from pianists Eliane Elias, Michika Fukumori, Lynne Arriale, Erroll Garner, Bill Anschell, and Brad Mehldau. We’ll also hear from pianist Jimmy Rowles, one of four musicians we’re featuring this month for their centennial birthdays, and from South African pianist Abdullah Ibrahim, who was just named a 2019 NEA Jazz Master.

Tuesday 8.14.18

Night Train marks birthdays of singer Lorez Alexandria and singer/pianists Ben Sidran and Jeannie Cheatham tonight. Plus more for our centennial birthdays feature – this time from pianist Jimmy Rowles (with guitarist Barney Kessel and saxophonists Gerry Mulligan and Ben Webster), vocalese pioneer Eddie Jefferson, and Texas tenor Arnett Cobb. New release tonight include Peter Erskine & the Dr. Um Band, Karrin Allyson, Eddie Henderson, Eddie Palmieri, Kurt Elling and Jared Gold.

Wednesday 8.15.18

Night Train marks birthdays of drummer Stix Hooper of the Crusaders and jazz piano great Oscar Peterson (featured in a special in hour two of the show). The August Four Centennials Feature continues, this time with music from Arnett Cobb, and there’s new music from Latin jazz ensemble Tribu, the Brubeck Brothers Quartet, and soul jazz organist Radam Schwartz.

Thursday 8.16.18

Night Train features music from pianists Bill Evans (featured in a Jazz Profiles special in hour two of the show) and Mal Waldron, singer Mary Stallings and drummer/producer Cecil Brooks III, all born on this date – along with more in the August Four Centennials Feature, this time from Jimmy Rowles and Eddie Jefferson.

Noteworthy

Edgar B. Smith/wichitaphotos.org

'Hope For The Future': The Dockum Sit-In, Sixty Years On

This year is the 60th anniversary of the first successful student-led sit-in of the modern civil rights movement. And it didn’t happen in the South, but rather in the heart of the Midwest: in Wichita.

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