Sarah Jane Crespo

Director of Community Engagement

Sarah Jane Crespo is the Director of Community Engagement at KMUW. She has worked at KMUW since 2010 in a variety of functions, from marketing to membership to accounting. Sarah Jane believes that public radio should empower listeners to take part in making their community the best it can be.

In her daily work, she leads the engagement department and plans and manages events such as Media Circus, Literary Feast and listener appreciation events. She is the creator and host of the monthly community conversation, Engage ICT: Democracy on Tap. As part of Engage ICT, Sarah Jane co-produced the public affairs program Kansas Women In Politics And The GOP, which was awarded honorable mention from the Kansas Association of Broadcasters in 2020.

On-air, she hosts middays on Thursdays and Fridays with shows like Here and Now, The BBC Newshour and Science Friday, and she serves as fill-in announcer. Sarah Jane has been an avid listener since her college days at Wichita State University.

 

Ways to Connect

Gabby Griffie

Using social media and community organizing skills, one WSU grad is tackling hunger by putting refrigerators exactly where they’re needed, and filling them up.

  

Tajahnae Stocker has been learning how to implement an idea that will help her community as part of a national Young Professionals program. She wanted to address food insecurity, even before COVID-19. Now, she’s making a difference in a fresh way, with the ICT Community Fridge Project.

At Newton Presbyterian Manor, there is independent living, assisted living and healthcare. During this difficult year, there’s also…music. Executive Director Marc Kessinger explains.

“The Corona Carolers started off probably in March of this year, just walking the sidewalks in a prayer group. And they asked if they could start singing through the windows. They’re just a tremendous group of ladies. They’ve got heart, they’re compassionate, and we appreciate them.”

For the past year, KMUW has been part of a new project from StoryCorps called One Small Step—conversations between strangers across the political divide. Today we hear from two people who experienced very different "Americas" growing up.

Here's part of the conversation between Alejo and Lisa:

StoryCorps’ One Small Step is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.

For the past year, KMUW has been involved with StoryCorps' One Small Step initiative, which brings people together with opposing political beliefs to have open respectful conversations. One Small Step is not about politics. It's an opportunity to talk about the life experiences that formed your values. In many instances, the participants discover they had more in common than they thought.

Today we hear from Jennifer, a conservative, and Elise, a liberal. Here is part of their conversation:

For the past year, KMUW has been part of a new project from StoryCorps called One Small Step—conversations between strangers across the political divide. Most of the participants discovered that they had more in common than they would have thought. Today we hear from Liz, who identifies as Christian, gay and liberal, and Alyssa, who identifies as Christian and conservative.

Here's part of their conversation:

StoryCorps’ One Small Step is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.

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Carla Jackson-Patton, founder of the Leonard Garrett Renaissance Institute, met Jennifer Connelly and Kent Rowe at an in-person Engage ICT event (remember those?) and began talking about alternative energy. Nowadays, though, they're talking about food. In this week's Viral Kindness, Carla and Jennifer explain their recent project.

Justin Campbell works at an A-OK Super Center, but he’s pursuing a degree from WSU to improve his skills. In one of his classes, he found a way to make a real difference for people during this difficult year, as part of a team project.

"This project is part of a course through Wichita State that’s about managing effective work teams, taught by Professor Rosen. The focus is on teaching us students to group together with disparate skills and backgrounds and to work together toward a common goal. This year, with everything going on, we all chose nonprofits of different causes.

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Amanda Meyers is the executive director of the Wichita Family Crisis Center. Here's the message of Viral Kindness she sent in:

"As you may know, we, in addition to other services, run a domestic violence and human trafficking shelter that is safe and confidential. And our back entrance has been wide open, even though our location is confidential.

As the United States celebrates the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment granting women the right to vote, KMUW is celebrating too with a behind the scenes peek of the new podcast, Hindsight. Creator Dr. Robin Henry sat down with Sarah Jane Crespo to discuss her method of capturing the history and importance of the women’s rights movement, as well as how it’s still relevant today.

Listen:

Or watch:

Miranda Standau and her son Ben spoke with me about a colorful tribute he gave to his hero, the family’s pediatrician.

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