News

Tim Evanson, flickr Creative Commons

New research out of Stanford University shows that limiting wastewater injection is helping to prevent man-made earthquakes in Kansas and Oklahoma.

The researchers have created a new physics-based model that can better predict where man-made earthquakes will occur by looking at increases in pressure. The model shows that the number of earthquakes is driven by how much wastewater is being injected into the ground.

Sedgwick County Zoo

The Sedgwick County Zoo could in 25 years be unrecognizable from the zoo visitors know today.

A new master plan unveiled Wednesday lays out a vision for the zoo's future, including expanded exhibits, a concert venue, an aquarium and an African savanna-themed hotel and resort.

The plan aims to take the zoo, now nearing its 50th birthday, to "the next level."

A new poll by Emerson College in Massachusetts finds the Kansas governor’s race is a statistical tie with five weeks to go until the general election.

The poll reports 37 percent of voters surveyed chose Republican Kris Kobach and 36 percent chose Democrat Laura Kelly if the election was held now.

Independent candidate Greg Orman received support from 9 percent of voters. About 15 percent of those surveyed are still undecided.

The poll indicates President Donald Trump is popular in Kansas with a 55 percent approval and 45 percent disapproval rating.

Abigail Beckman / KMUW, File Photo

Wichita State University will hold a ceremony Tuesday in memory of the 1970 plane crash involving the university's football team.

On Oct. 2, 1970, a plane carrying the WSU football team — along with administrators and fans — crashed in the Rocky Mountains. The crash killed 31 people, including 14 football players and the university's athletic director, Bert Katzenmeyer. Nine people survived.

Textron Aviation

The Kansas economy has been sluggish the past few years, but the candidates running for governor each have a plan to jumpstart things.

Will any of them actually work?

Enrollment at public colleges in Kansas fell about half of a percent this fall, according to a new report from the Kansas Board of Regents released Monday.

Pittsburg State University's enrollment declined just under 4 percent — the largest decrease for a state university this year. Fort Hays State University had the largest percent increase with a little over 2 percent.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

The Joyland carousel will soon be spinning again, more than 14 years after the amusement park closed.

Botanica is breaking ground Monday on its new Carousel Gardens. The $3 million addition will house the newly restored carousel, which Joyland donated to Botanica in 2014.

The carousel was built in 1949 and served as a staple of the Wichita amusement park until it closed in 2004.

Marty Miller, Botanica’s executive director, said it was important to preserve history by keeping the carousel in Wichita.

LaRissa Lawrie / KMUW/File photo

Starting next year, Kansas counties are required to do post-election audits. The check will make sure the voting process — from equipment to office procedures — is done correctly, and the election results are accurate.

According to legislation approved earlier this year, a county election board will review at least one contested race on federal, state and county levels.

According to legislation approved earlier this year, a county election board will review at least one contested race on federal, state and county levels.

Screenshot via CSPAN

For victims and survivors of sexual assault, the ongoing coverage of the allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh can be especially difficult to watch.

The Wichita Area Sexual Assault Center (WASAC) says it’s seen an increase in calls this week to its 24-hour crisis line – some of it in response to Thursday’s testimony from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who alleges Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school.

macrophile, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas foster care contractors will now be paying a financial price for kids sleeping in their offices. The plan was made public Friday during a meeting of a child welfare task force.

Department for Children and Families Secretary Gina Meier-Hummel said the contractors will face fines and citations against their licenses. The fines and citation consequences won't be set unless there's a violation, she said.

Last year, the public learned that kids were sleeping in the offices of Kansas foster care contractors because of a lack of available placements on short notice.

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