baseball

City of Wichita

The city of Wichita is aiming for a March 2020 completion date on its new multi-use baseball stadium in Delano.

City Council members Tuesday morning approved a memorandum of understanding with its new Triple-A team, the New Orleans Baby Cakes, an affiliate of the Miami Marlins.

The city will build a $75 million stadium to replace historic Lawrence-Dumont Stadium and will spend another $6 million on riverfront renovations, including a new pedestrian bridge over the Arkansas River.

City of Wichita

Top-level minor league baseball likely will return to Wichita in 2020.

Mayor Jeff Longwell said Thursday that the New Orleans Baby Cakes of the Pacific Coast League have filed an application to relocate to Wichita. The application must be approved by Minor League Baseball and the Pacific Coast League. It also must be reviewed by Major League Baseball.

League 42 / via Facebook

The nonprofit baseball organization known as League 42 in Wichita is moving ahead with plans to build an indoor practice facility.

The league wants to renovate an existing building across from its baseball complex at McAdams Park near downtown.

Businessman David Murfin owns the property on East 17th Street and offered the league a nominal lease agreement.

League 42 executive director Bob Lutz says the building will provide a venue for baseball training and academics.

Jonathan Huber / KMUW/File photo

Over the next two weeks, 30 teams from across the country will play 57 games as part of the National Baseball Congress World Series now underway at Lawrence-Dumont Stadium.

But this year's tournament could be the last one played at the historic site.

The World Series has been played at Lawrence-Dumont Stadium every summer since it was founded by Hap Dumont in 1935.

Hear an Audio Postcard from last year's NBC World Series

“There’s not many organizations that say they have played at the same location for 84 years," says tournament director Kevin Jenks.

League 42 / Facebook

The youth baseball season begins Monday for League 42 in Wichita.

The non-profit baseball organization is based out of McAdams Park near downtown, but some games are moving to Linwood Park while crews finish field renovations at McAdams.

Construction delays due to high winds and cold weather forced organizers to push back opening ceremonies to next Monday.

Bob Lutz, the executive director of League 42, says renovation work at two ball diamonds is nearly complete.

Kate Hutchens / KMUW/File photo

Mayor Jeff Longwell said Thursday that Wichita is in the final stages of talks to bring an affiliated baseball team back to the city.

After weeks of touting a major “baseball announcement,” Longwell said he can’t make the announcement everyone’s been waiting for—yet.

“If we were to name them today, we would jeopardize the process," he said during his address at the Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce Issue Forum.

Kate Hutchens / KMUW/File photo

The city of Wichita hired a consulting group Tuesday to help attract a Major League-affiliated baseball team to the area for the first time in a decade.

Each summer since 1935, Lawrence-Dumont Stadium hosts the National Baseball Congress World Series. The Wichita crowd is multi-generational. Children attend with their grandparents, who saw previous tournaments with their parents and grandparents. Most teams are amateur or semi-pro. Recently, as we hear in this Audio Postcard from KMUW's Jonathan Huber, one of the teams is comprised of retired Major Leaguers. 

Courtesy Photo

Only July 24, 1983, the New York Yankees and Kansas City Royals played what has become known as the pine tar game. Playing at Yankee Stadium, the Royals were behind when George Brett hit a two-run home run. Or thought he did.

http://www.thestrengthcoach.com

Sunday marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The law has increased access to public buildings and worked to end workplace discrimination, but for some people, a stigma still exists. One man is hoping a simple Major League Baseball game will help.

Greg Smith is a person. He’s not a disability. And that simple idea is what he believes many people still have trouble understanding. He’s had muscular dystrophy his whole life, and lives in Mississippi.

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