drinking water

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service

HARTFORD, Kansas — Some of Kansas’ major reservoirs are filling up with sediment, and if something isn’t done to address the issue, parts of eastern Kansas could see water shortages and insufficient flood control as soon as 30 years from now.

To help slow down the slow, but consistent, reduction of usable water storage in Kansas’ reservoirs, the Kansas Water Office is trying to help farmers in critical areas upstream of the lakes to reduce the water running off from their fields.

But if that isn’t widely accepted, state officials say taxpayers may have to pay millions more just to keep the water flowing.

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service file photo

WICHITA, Kansas — The water coming out of your tap might meet legal standards, but that doesn’t mean that it’s safe to drink — at least according to the Environmental Working Group, an environmental advocacy nonprofit.

EWG found that nearly all of the 870 water utilities in Kansas tested for at least one contaminate above what it considers safe, though most water utilities in the state meet federal standards, which are different than EWG’s. 

mcdarius, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas man has been accused of falsifying the water quality reports he was required to send to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Arthur Wolfe, a former water system operator for Garden Plain, allegedly made false statements about the quality of the city's drinking water.

Alex Smith / Harvest Public Media

A new report suggests the Environmental Protection Agency should consider lowering the legal limit in drinking water for nitrates, a chemical often connected to fertilizer use.

USGS

The City of Wichita is responding to a handful of complaints from people in west Wichita and north of downtown noticing a distinctive taste and odor in their tap water.

Alex Smith / KCUR

Pretty Prairie, Kansas, population 680, had a moment in the spotlight during the confirmation hearings for new Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt.

Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran mentioned Pretty Prairie as an example of a community that’s struggling because of EPA regulations that Pruitt could ease.

But residents of the tiny south-central Kansas town are also concerned about how federal budget cuts might affect their ability to pay for a new water treatment system.

mcdarius, flickr Creative Commons

The Global Learning Center of Wichita is hosting a series of talks this weekend about climate change and its threat to the world’s water and food supplies.

The nonprofit has been around since 1988 and is focused on presenting issues that affect people both in Kansas and around the world. The organization’s latest series of speakers will narrow in on climate change and what it’s doing to the world’s water and food supplies.

A new EPA report to Congress says the nation's drinking water infrastructure will need $384 billion dollars worth of improvements over the next 20 years, including more than $4 billion in Kansas.

William Carr manages the revolving loan fund that finances drinking water projects in Kansas. He says most of the projects on the list are for transmission and distribution, especially the underground pipes that carry water to homes and businesses.

Kansas Gets C- For Infrastructure

May 22, 2013

Civil engineers have given Kansas' infrastructure an overall C-minus grade.

The regional chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers released their report card Wednesday.

It's an evaluation of the state's aviation, bridges, roads, dams, drinking water, energy, levees, railroads and schools.

The engineers found the most faults with the state's bridges and dams, rating them a D-minus. They say Kansas has nearly 3,000 structurally deficient bridges.

They awarded the highest grades for the state's roads and schools; both got a C-plus.