Nadya Faulx

Digital News Editor / Reporter

Nadya Faulx is KMUW's Digital News Editor and Reporter, which means she splits her time between working on-air and working online, managing news on KMUW.org, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. She joined KMUW in 2015 after working for a newspaper in western North Dakota. Before that she was a diversity intern at NPR in Washington, D.C.

Nadya has a master's degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and a bachelor’s degree in international studies from CU Denver. Before entering the world of journalism, she worked at a dog daycare and taught English in the Republic of Georgia.

While at KMUW, Nadya has been honored with a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in social media and a first place award from the Kansas Association of Broadcasters Award (KAB) for Public Affairs Program. She received first place with Beth Golay for the En Route segment of The Range and second place for Spot News and Station Website in 2020 from the Kansas Association of Broadcasters. In 2019, she received a first place KAB award in spot news for Wichita To Get New Baseball Team, Stadium. 

A native Texan and Colorado transplant, Nadya enjoys traveling, reading and hanging out with her dogs, Sunny and Zero, and her cat, Dragon.

 

 

Ways to Connect

Ark Valley Fire Buff / flickr Creative Commons

The ACLU of Kansas and Kansas Appleseed are seeking to end the Wichita Police Department’s longstanding use of a confidential gang list, claiming it is unconstitutional.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Advocates for passenger rail are optimistic the $2 trillion infrastructure package President Joe Biden outlined this week could speed up efforts to bring service back to Wichita.

Matt Stamey/Wichita Journalism Collaborative

Beginning Monday, all Kansans 16 and older will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Gov. Laura Kelly said Friday the state is ready to move into the fifth and final phase of its vaccine rollout, opening appointments up to the general public.

“With the anticipated increase in supply from the federal government, we must get every dose of vaccine into arms quickly,” Kelly said in a statement. “I strongly encourage every Kansan to get the COVID-19 vaccine so we can get back to school, back to work, and back to normal.”

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Sedgwick County is now offering vaccines to residents in all categories in Phase 2 of the state’s vaccination plan.

Phase 2 includes public safety, higher education, restaurant, aviation and transportation workers, along with workers in about a dozen other critical industries. Congregate settings, like homeless shelters, are also included.

.deeneg / flickr Creative Commons

As the COVID-19 infection rate falls to its lowest in months, Sedgwick County is beginning to ease some health restrictions.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

After two months at Intrust Bank Arena, Sedgwick County is relocating one of its COVID-19 vaccine clinics to the former central library in downtown Wichita.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Wichita North High School will no longer be the Redskins.

The school board voted 6-0 Monday night to drop the controversial mascot at the recommendation of a committee formed last summer.

CRAIG KOHLRUSS

After a bumpy early rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine, Sedgwick County says it expects to begin receiving regular shipments.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Karen Smith decided five years ago to move into Wichita Presbyterian Manor.

"It was a good decision," she said. "I wanted to come early. I was in the mood to move and get in some place I could be in for the rest of my life."

At 75, she’s among the younger residents there. She lives in the independent living unit — the sprawling campus at 13th and Zoo Boulevard also includes assisted living, memory care, long-term care and health services — and enjoys staying active.

Christopher Sessums / flickr Creative Commons

After learning remotely since December, Wichita elementary students could be back in the classroom as early as next Wednesday.


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