The Range

Carla Eckels / KMUW

A momentous election is now less than 40 days away, and a local group has been working hard to register young voters.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

Sports are back, but where are all the fans? This week on The Range, we examine the age-old existential question: If a golfer makes a hole-in-one and no one's there to see it, did it really happen?

Plus, we take a tour of an architectural wonder of Wichita that's hiding in plain sight.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

You can hardly call the Allen-Lambe house hidden.

The intriguing structure, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, has been standing at the corner of 2nd and Roosevelt in College Hill — in the heart of Wichita — since 1918. But many people in town don’t know it’s there, even if they drive by it every day. Or, if they do know, they don’t realize what a treasure it is.

Courtesy Wichita Thunder

Since 1979, Roy Turner has been fixture on the Wichita sports scene, first with the Wichita Wings indoor soccer team and now with the Wichita Open golf tournament.

And for every one of those years, his job included attracting fans.

"I've been 40 years in this town, basically selling tickets," Turner said, his voice still sprinkled with an accent from his native Liverpool. "And now I've got a plan to keep tickets in my pocket and keep people away. It's just a brand new thing for me."

Thanks to the pandemic, it’s a whole new ball game for sporting events.

Holly Mulcahy

Six months in a pandemic has meant six months of virtual events.

That’s also led to a lot of “Zoom fatigue.”

While in-person events are slowly returning, large gatherings like galas and festivals are still regulated to online-only. Here are four tips from Wichita organizers about how to draw attention in the saturated virtual world:

Public speaking skills

Carla Eckels / KMUW

Working from home and tired of looking at Zoom screens all day? Us too. After several months in quarantine, there's got to be a way to spice things up. Today on The Range, we run down some tips on how to improve your virtual meeting and livestream events.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

Wichita is in the process of replacing its vintage-looking trolleys with new electric vehicles. But with the free Q Line on hiatus because of the pandemic, it's anyone's guess when the public will be able to ride them. Today on The Range, we go en route the new Q.

Plus, we've heard it hundreds of times by now: Fill out the census. But what are we missing out on if we don't? (Turns out, a lot.)

Torin Andersen / KMUW

Creating art can be a trial-and-error process. So is finding a way to exhibit your work during a pandemic.

This week on The Range, we talk to two Wichita artists who thought they'd found a way to put on a show — until they realized they needed to think more inside the box.

Plus, we visit a shrimp farm. In Sumner County. In landlocked Kansas.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

When Bob Daniels started telling people he wanted to start a shrimp farm in Sumner County, the response was what you might expect.

"'You're going to sell bait, huh?'" he said laughing while recalling one comment. "In fact, when we started looking to grow the shrimp and look for some financing … the local banker said, 'Well, you're never going to sell this.'

"Now, it turns out, I can't grow it fast enough to sell what people were willing to buy."

Carla Eckels / KMUW

It’s no secret that newspaper circulation has been declining in recent years. Black newspapers mirror trends in the industry overall — but there’s one paper based in Wichita that’s keeping its head above water.

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