Local News

Morry Gash / AP

Hospitals across Kansas have started vaccinating frontline health care workers against COVID-19.

Public health officials have said a widely available vaccine will ultimately control the pandemic that has killed almost 2,500 people in the state.

As the vaccines become available to the general public, America Amplified is gathering and curating answers from experts to questions on the minds of public radio listeners across the country.

Courtesy Ti'Juana Hardwell

In early 2016, residents of Wichita’s City Council District 1 got together to discuss what businesses they wanted to see move in at 13th and Oliver.

The Walmart Neighborhood Market there had just closed; so had the QuikTrip across the street.

But neighbors saw those losses as a chance to bring in new businesses that could benefit the area.

The Range | Dec. 18, 2020

Dec 18, 2020
Beth Golay / KMUW

This week on The Range, we meet a woman who's driven by the memory of her late mother to bring joy to other people's lives.

And, we talk to a community activist in Wichita who's pushing back on the payday lending industry after a title loan company moved into her neighborhood.

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service/File photo

The Kansas Board of Regents formed a closed committee on Wednesday to recommend whom the Regents should select as Wichita State University's next president.

Wichita lawyer Dan Peare will chair the Wichita State University Presidential Search Committee. Peare earned two degrees at WSU. He also serves on the WSU Foundation Board of Directors and National Advisory Council.

Regent Allen Schmidt will represent the board on the committee alongside Regent CEO and President Blake Flanders.

The other committee members include:

Grandparents Tackle Remote Learning With Their Grandkids

Dec 16, 2020
Khanh Nguyen / The Sunflower

Bel Aire retiree Gary O’Neal stood on his deck, the smell of frying bacon wafting up from the grill. He wasn’t just enjoying a leisurely Wednesday evening, though. He was meal-prepping for yet another school day.

At 73 years old, O’Neal hadn’t planned on going back to school any time soon. But now he and his wife Jackie spend their days helping grandson Jaxon and granddaughter Austyn with their online classes through Isely Elementary.

commerce.senate.gov/Screenshot

The co-owner of two Wichita music venues testified before Congress on Tuesday that his industry "desperately" needs help.

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Consider the mounting money problems facing public universities in Kansas.

Decades of ballooning tuition have made students and their families increasingly worried about college debt. Tech schools offer cheaper faster paths to a solid job. Help from taxpayers has waned.

Then came the pandemic. Campuses had to spend heavily to retool for safety during the outbreak. Still, large numbers of students and the money they would have spent on dorms, tuition and the like stayed away.

Wichita Eagle

Health care workers in Wichita were among the first in the state to get the new COVID-19 vaccination.

Five employees of the Ascension Via Christi health system received shots at St. Francis Hospital Monday.  The hospital says a critical care nurse, a housekeeper for a COVID-19 unit and a respiratory therapist were among those who were vaccinated.  Frontline health workers at other Ascension Via Christi facilities in Kansas will receive the vaccination later this week.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — The way kids in Kansas learn to read is in for a major rewrite.

Teachers will soon ditch their time-worn old memorize-and-context-clues methods. In their place, they’ll work with state teacher colleges on new styles meant to accommodate dyslexic students and other children who struggle with books. For instance, they’ll train kids to break down words and to methodically drill through English’s tricky rules.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment

WICHITA, Kansas — The number of Kansans who have died from COVID-19 topped 2,000 on Friday after the state announced 131 new deaths.

How quickly the state passed that milestone — it took the state seven-plus months to lose its first 1,000 people to the coronavirus, and little more than a month to lose 1,000 more — shows how quickly the spread is accelerating.

“There’s just so many more people getting COVID right now that inevitably that’s going to lead to more death,” said Steve Stites, chief medical officer at the University of Kansas Health System.

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