Energy & Environment

Support for KMUW's energy and environment coverage comes from ITC Great Plains and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Kansas Highway Patrol Air Support Unit

WICHITA, Kansas — Utility companies in Kansas will soon have a new accounting tool that could speed the closure of coal-fired power plants — and save customers money.

The financial tool is known as securitization. It’s not a new idea, but it is complex. The Kansas Legislature passed a bill approving the use of the tool after more than two years of discussion.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

While getting his master’s degree from Wichita State University, Jesse Marks wrote his thesis on food insecurity.

Along the way, he discovered that food waste is a major problem, too.

He learned that a typical American family adds more than 500 pounds of food scraps to landfills each year.

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Wind now cranks up more kilowatts than any other power source in the state.

Jordan Kirtley / KMUW

In partnership with 1A Across America, KMUW presented a live and local edition of the national public radio program 1A. The Friday News Roundup: Wichita Edition aired on KMUW 89.1 FM at 12:00 p.m. CT on Friday, March 19.

1A host Jenn White and this panel of local experts discussed the latest news in Wichita:

-Tom Shine, KMUW Director of News and Public Affairs
-Nadya Faulx, KMUW Digital News Editor/Reporter
-Teresa Lovelady, President and CEO of HealthCore Clinic

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service

OVERLAND PARK, Kansas — Nearly 70 years ago in a newly formed suburb of Kansas City, Kansas City Power & Light Co. built what it thought was a vision of the future — an all-electric home full of the latest technology.

“It was advertised as the lazy man’s paradise,” said Johnson County Museum curator Andrew Gustafson.

Gas furnace
Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Last February, the city of Cheney, Kansas – located just west of Wichita – paid about $2 per thousand cubic feet, or unit, of natural gas on the wholesale market.

But last week, during the height of the winter storm, it was paying more than $600 per unit.

“We didn’t have the option to just say, ‘We don’t want gas for our community,’” said Cheney City Administrator Danielle Young.  “We just had to take the price we were given to make sure our residents were staying warm.”

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