schools

Christine H. / flickr Creative Commons

Members of law enforcement will ride on school buses beginning Monday to cite motorists who fail to stop when buses are loading and unloading children.

The Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office is partnering with the Wichita, Maize and Haysville Police Departments on a project to crack down on violations around school buses. The enforcement is part of  this week's National School Bus Safety week.

Participating school districts included Derby, Haysville, Maize and Wichita.

FILE PHOTO / Kansas News Service

Kansas' high school graduation rate continued to trend upward with the class of 2018 as schools put a growing emphasis on preventing students from dropping out.

Of the students who started at both public and private high schools in 2014, 87.5 percent graduated within four years, an increase from the 86.9 percent rate of the previous freshman class, according to newly published state data.

A diploma is paramount.

Kansas teachers have lost their second attempt to get tenure back for thousands of educators through the courts — but say they will continue their battle at the Legislature.

“So this is a disappointment,” teachers union spokesman Marcus Baltzell said of the decision handed down by the Kansas Supreme Court Friday. “But it's just one step."

Friday’s decision from the state’s highest court was unanimous.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

The U.S. Department of Education has thrown its weight behind a Kansas school plan that aims for much higher rates of math and reading proficiency by 2030.

Initial feedback from the federal agency on Kansas’ 90-page blueprint for closing achievement gaps had been lackluster, forcing the state to revise it.

Larry Darling, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Highway Patrol is making the rounds in school districts across the state, inspecting school buses and other vehicles that transport students.

Troopers began their vehicle inspections this week and will continue through the first days of school in August.

The goal is to make sure every bus and school vehicle will load, transport and unload students safely. Lt. Adam Winters says troopers check for defects in equipment and mechanical conditions.

A Kansas Supreme Court Justice Eric Rosen said during a hearing Tuesday he worries about "constant litigation" if the court sides with school districts that have sued the state to increase public education funding.

A state law enacted in 2006 set the state's base funding for public schools at $4,492 per student each year, but the current base state funding is $3,838 per student, or nearly 15 percent less. In 2010, a lower court ruled that the state must boost its annual spending on public schools by at least $440 million a year.  That lawsuit followed one filed in 1999. 

Kansas Gets C- For Infrastructure

May 22, 2013

Civil engineers have given Kansas' infrastructure an overall C-minus grade.

The regional chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers released their report card Wednesday.

It's an evaluation of the state's aviation, bridges, roads, dams, drinking water, energy, levees, railroads and schools.

The engineers found the most faults with the state's bridges and dams, rating them a D-minus. They say Kansas has nearly 3,000 structurally deficient bridges.

They awarded the highest grades for the state's roads and schools; both got a C-plus.