Deborah Shaar

News Reporter

Reporter Deborah Shaar joined the news team at KMUW in September 2014. She spent more than a dozen years working in news at both public and commercial radio and television stations in Ohio, West Virginia, and Detroit, Michigan. Before relocating to Wichita, Deborah taught news and broadcasting classes at Tarrant County College in the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, area.

Deborah’s reporting has earned state, regional and national awards for excellence in journalism. In 2018, she won regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow awards in the hard news and news feature categories. She also won four awards in the Kansas Association of Broadcasters (KAB) annual contest in hard news, news feature, sports feature and severe weather coverage categories.

She won a national Sigma Delta Chi award from Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) in 2017 for investigative reporting. She also won first-place in the KAB 2017 contest for news feature.

In 2016, she earned a regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow award for investigative reporting. The Kansas Association of Broadcasters recognized her reporting with two awards in 2016, and one award in 2015.

She began her on-air career as a news reporter and anchor at several small market TV stations in southeast Ohio and West Virginia. She fine-tuned her writing and producing skills while working on a highly rated three-hour morning news show at the Fox TV affiliate in Detroit, Michigan. From there, she put her on-air, writing and producing skills to good use: training and developing broadcast news students at Ohio University. As managing editor of the WOUB radio and television newsroom, Deborah served in a crucial role as supervisor of the student-staffed nightly television newscast. Many of her student anchors, reporters and producers earned prestigious national, state and regional awards—and still work in the news business today. She continued her on-air work as a fill-in anchor for a statewide TV news network in Ohio.

Deborah earned Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in journalism from Ohio University. Her master’s thesis is a historical narrative about the transformation of journalism training at the University of Leipzig, Germany, as a result of Germany’s reunification.

Ways to Connect

Kansas Aviation Museum

The Kansas Aviation Museum in Wichita is asking Sedgwick County for more financial support.

Museum executive director Tim Norton requested $50,000 from the county to help stabilize the nonprofit museum and take it to the next level.

“Right now it’s a one-time ask to give me a little breathing room to do the things that I think need to be done,” Norton said.

Norton, a former Sedgwick County commissioner, made his case during a county staff meeting on Tuesday.

Andrea Klinke Johannsen / flickr Creative Commons

An employment forecast released Thursday projects continued economic growth for both the Wichita area and Kansas next year.

Wichita State University’s Center for Economic Development and Business Research (CEDBR) conducts industry-level employment surveys each year to help formulate its forecasts.

CEDBR Director Jeremy Hill says the Wichita area is expected to grow about 0.5% in 2020, adding about 1,600 new jobs. The workforce expanded by 1.3% this year.

He says the slow job growth pattern is a turnaround from 2017 when the region lost jobs.

pixabay / flickr Creative Commons

Newton is the latest city in Kansas to raise the legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21.

Starting Jan. 1, retailers in Newton won’t be allowed to sell cigarettes, e-cigarettes, chewing tobacco or other tobacco products to anyone under the age of 21.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Organizers with the group “Save Century II” support a city of Wichita recommendation to build a new performing arts center. They also say there is an opportunity to preserve the blue-domed round building.

Greg Kite with the Historic Preservation Alliance and community arts supporter Celeste Racette started the campaign to bring awareness of the historical value of Century II, and to keep the process of determining the future of Century II open to the public.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

In a few months, the latest plan for developing downtown Wichita’s riverfront area will be released.

The details and recommendations are supposed to help guide the city to a final decision about the Century II complex. One aspect has already been decided: The city of Wichita has determined that it can’t transform the 50-year-old building into a modern performing arts venue.

KMUW/File photo

There won’t be a revote on allowing slot machines at Wichita Greyhound Park in Sedgwick County anytime soon.

Maize USD 266

Voters in the Maize school district approved a $108.2 million bond for two new schools and a complex for an auditorium and indoor swimming pool.

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service/File photo

Large-scale commercial wind farms won’t be built in Sedgwick County.

Newton Public Schools, Facebook

The Newton School District is asking voters to approve an $86 million bond proposal for high school upgrades and a new elementary school.

The bond issue is split into two ballot questions for the district’s special election.

The first question involves upgrades to Newton High School and safety and security projects at all schools. The projects total about $61 million.

The district wants to add a new science wing and a gym that would double as a storm shelter at Newton High.

Maize USD 266

A special election will be held next week for the Maize School District. The district is asking voters to approve a $108.2 million bond issue that is split into two questions.

The first question is for the construction of two intermediate schools that would house fifth and sixth grades; districtwide safety and security improvements; and upgrades to Maize High and Maize South High schools. The projects would cost about $79 million.

Pages