Deborah Shaar

News Reporter

Reporter Deborah Shaar joined the news team at KMUW in September 2014. She spent more than a dozen years working in news at both public and commercial radio and television stations in Ohio, West Virginia, and Detroit, Michigan. Before relocating to Wichita, Deborah taught news and broadcasting classes at Tarrant County College in the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, area.

Deborah’s reporting has earned state, regional and national awards for excellence in journalism. In 2018, she won regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow awards in the hard news and news feature categories. She also won four awards in the Kansas Association of Broadcasters (KAB) annual contest in hard news, news feature, sports feature and severe weather coverage categories.

She won a national Sigma Delta Chi award from Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) in 2017 for investigative reporting. She also won first-place in the KAB 2017 contest for news feature.

In 2016, she earned a regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow award for investigative reporting. The Kansas Association of Broadcasters recognized her reporting with two awards in 2016, and one award in 2015.

She began her on-air career as a news reporter and anchor at several small market TV stations in southeast Ohio and West Virginia. She fine-tuned her writing and producing skills while working on a highly rated three-hour morning news show at the Fox TV affiliate in Detroit, Michigan. From there, she put her on-air, writing and producing skills to good use: training and developing broadcast news students at Ohio University. As managing editor of the WOUB radio and television newsroom, Deborah served in a crucial role as supervisor of the student-staffed nightly television newscast. Many of her student anchors, reporters and producers earned prestigious national, state and regional awards—and still work in the news business today. She continued her on-air work as a fill-in anchor for a statewide TV news network in Ohio.

Deborah earned Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in journalism from Ohio University. Her master’s thesis is a historical narrative about the transformation of journalism training at the University of Leipzig, Germany, as a result of Germany’s reunification.

Ways to Connect

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service/File photo

Large-scale commercial wind farms won’t be built in Sedgwick County.

Newton Public Schools, Facebook

The Newton School District is asking voters to approve an $86 million bond proposal for high school upgrades and a new elementary school.

The bond issue is split into two ballot questions for the district’s special election.

The first question involves upgrades to Newton High School and safety and security projects at all schools. The projects total about $61 million.

The district wants to add a new science wing and a gym that would double as a storm shelter at Newton High.

Maize USD 266

A special election will be held next week for the Maize School District. The district is asking voters to approve a $108.2 million bond issue that is split into two questions.

The first question is for the construction of two intermediate schools that would house fifth and sixth grades; districtwide safety and security improvements; and upgrades to Maize High and Maize South High schools. The projects would cost about $79 million.

stacey_newman / Getty Images/iStockphoto

A Wichita group that works to prevent substance abuse in the community is trying a new approach to reach at-risk young people.

The Safe Streets Coalition selected five students to serve as mental health advocates for their peers at Wichita high schools. Safe Streets calls their teen volunteers “youth mobilizers.”

Program leader Ngoc Vuong says youth mobilizers will support students who struggle with mental health issues or substance abuse.

Sedgwick County

Sedgwick County commissioners approved the $457 million 2020 budget at their weekly meeting Wednesday.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW/File photo

Sedgwick County commissioners voted Wednesday to bring an end to a potential ethics investigation into the previous board of commissioners.

Former Commissioner Richard Ranzau prompted the investigation in October when he accused some of his colleagues of misconduct and unethical behavior.

flickr, Creative Commons

A task force begins work next month on updating the Kansas Alzheimer’s Disease Plan.

A statewide plan to address anticipated growth in the number of Alzheimer’s patients was released earlier this year but was never implemented.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Cursive handwriting is no longer a necessity in school or daily life. But the fancy flowing script will always have a connection to history, and being able to read cursive remains an important skill.

That’s why the Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum is teaching cursive writing to young people. The museum offers free penmanship workshops throughout the year.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Shelves of food, bottled water and personal care products fill the old choir room at St. John’s Episcopal Church on North Topeka in downtown Wichita.

It's the new distribution center for the growing Wichita-based food pantry program Paxton’s Blessing Box.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

The Wichita Police Department is emphasizing gun safety education to reduce the rising number of gun thefts happening throughout the community.

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