Kansas State University

k-state.edu

MANHATTAN — Kansas State football players say they will boycott all team activities until administrators create a policy that would allow a student to be expelled for "openly racist, threatening or disrespectful actions."

The move that most players announced this weekend on social media follows a tweet by a student about the death of George Floyd that prompted outrage on campus.

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service file photo

WICHITA, Kansas — Gone are the days of sneaking late into a crowded lecture hall. Reading college students' disapproving faces won't be easy. And Thanksgiving is the new Christmas.

There’ll be a lot of adjustments this fall for students and professors at Kansas’ universities, institutions that have been finalizing plans for how they’ll keep everyone safe from the coronavirus when in-person instruction returns.

Colleges and universities in Kansas and Missouri are rolling out plans for the fall semester, which will look very different because of COVID-19.

The University of Missouri-Kansas City plans to hold the majority of classes in-person but to limit class size to 25% of room capacity, a move that will require a longer school day.

“We expect most students to have a schedule that combines in-person classes with some blended or online courses, unless they specifically request all online,” Provost Jenny Lundgren wrote in an email to students, faculty and staff on Monday.

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service

The testimonials from black people about their experience on Kansas college campuses ring both familiar and fresh as protests against racism continue across the world.

Some talk about death threats riddled with racial slurs tucked in their mailboxes, about baseless confrontations with campus police, or about being told in ways both subtle and explicit that they don’t belong.

James Ehlers

WICHITA, Kansas — Educators say there was a silver lining when Kansas schools and campuses had to shut down because of the coronavirus: It was a chance to learn how to do remote learning right.

Now with college finals submitted and most K-12 schools in summer vacation mode, educators are reflecting on those two months of online teaching, especially knowing that some universities will have to do it again come fall (Wichita State plans online-only instruction after Thanksgiving).

Here are six things that Kansas professors and teachers say they’ve learned outside of the physical classroom.

Ming Chang Chay / For Wichita State University

WICHITA, Kansas — The coronavirus has left Kansas’ international college students with a choice: stay in the United States, even if it hurts them financially, or leave and risk not being allowed back into the United States.

TOPEKA, Kansas — What if researchers could go to a single hub for vast deposits of information on a range of issues from water quality to court rulings to the medicinal powers of marijuana?

Armed with all that existing research, they might begin to draw conclusions that apply across the country. They might also avoid repeating the work of other researchers.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service file photo

For decades, a university education meant students had to load up on math, history and English courses. Now, Kansas universities are slashing those general education requirements so more students can graduate on time and have more room for classes in their major.

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

MANHATTAN, Kansas — Millennials get blamed for killing off sports, drinks and entire industries. Those millennials — and their Gen Z successors — have also given rise to a new word: adulting.

Aging folks from the baby boom or Generation X enjoy ridiculing today's college students when those younger people can't change a tire or wash their clothes without turning to Mom or Dad.

Wichita State, K-State Planning Joint Nursing Program

Sep 18, 2019
flickr/Creative Commons

Wichita State University is partnering with Kansas State University to start a satellite nursing program at K-State.

The partnership addresses the rising need for registered nurses in Kansas.

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