Laura Ziegler

Laura Ziegler began her career at KCUR as a reporter more than 20 years ago. She became the news director in the mid 1980's and  in 1988,  went to National Public Radio in Washington, D.C. as a producer for Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon.

In 1993, she came back to Kansas City as the Midwest correspondent for National Public Radio. Among the stories she covered - the floods of 1993, the ongoing farm crisis and rural affairs, and presidential campaigns.

After the birth of her 3rd child, Laura returned to KCUR as producer of Under the Clock, a weekly talk show broadcast live from Union Station. It was hosted by former Kansas City mayor Emanuel Cleaver. When he was elected 5th district Congressman in 2002, Laura returned to KCUR as a part-time reporter and producer.

Laura has won numerous awards for her work, including three regional Edward R. Murrow awards.

In 1992, Laura was awarded a Jefferson Fellowship in Journalism with the East West Center at the University of Hawaii which took her to China, Japan, Burma, Bangladesh and Thailand.  In 1990, she was part of a reporting trip to the then -Soviet Union with the American Center for International Leadership.

Laura graduated with a Bachelors Degree in Anthropology from Vassar College.

She, her husband, and their three children - Julia, Ellie, and Benjamin, live with Laura's father in the house in which she was born.

Dena Duffin, 53, pulls her teenage son close as she looks into the trailer stuffed with tables, tubs of housewares and whatever else they were able to salvage when the tornado ripped their home off its foundation the night of May 28.

“I gave that to my dad,” she says, pointing to a dented copper tub. “And there’s a stepstool and shelf my dad made for us. You can’t replace those kinds of things.”

Updated, 10:30 a.m. Thursday: The meeting this week ended with a commitment to resist the plan approved in February at the General Conference; the church leaders present are not yet calling for a split. Some churches will continue to marry and ordain LGBTQ members.

The original post continues below.

The United Methodist Church is in crisis.

In February, the General Conference of the church held a special session in St. Louis, Missouri, to decide whether to allow marriage and ordination for its LGBTQ members.

In the wake of Sept. 11, federal officials said the United States needed a new, state-of-the-art facility to defend against bioterrorism and stop diseases that could devastate the country’s farm economy and threaten human lives. They chose Manhattan, Kansas, as the site of the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility. 

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Leaders of the India Association of Kansas City met at a Scooter's Coffee in south Overland Park Wednesday night to plan the first India Day celebration.

Most of these men did not know Srinivas Kutchibhotla, the 32-year-old Garmin engineer and Indian immigrant who was shot and killed on Feb. 22, 2017, at Austin’s Bar and Grill in Olathe. Nor did they know his best friend, Alok Madasini, or Ian Grillot, a bar patron who intervened.

But they all agree the tragedy sent frightening ripples through the local Indian community.


USDA / flickr Creative Commons

Since its inception over a decade ago, the Department of Homeland Security has had authority over the $1.3 billion National Bio and Agro-defense Facility, or NBAF, under construction on the campus of Kansas State University.

Wikimedia Commons

National Democrats are targeting three-term Kansas Rep. Kevin Yoder as vulnerable in their attempt to retake Congress in 2018.

Six Democrats are competing for the right to challenge Yoder next November.

If third-quarter campaign finance reports are any indication, the Republican incumbent's campaign is mounting a serious defense.

Wikipedia

High-level NATO officials from 14 countries concluded secret meetings in Kansas City this week. In the meeting, the NATO Medical Working Group heard details about biosecurity research at Kansas State University.

President Richard Myers told the NATO representatives he’d seen bioterror threats up close during his time as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

He said the U.S., and particularly the Midwest, are potential targets of such threats.

Ron Trewyn is the liaison for the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility at K–State.

NASA HQ PHOTO / Creative Commons, flickr

The path of totality, marked by today's historic total eclipse of the sun, arcs across much of Kansas City and its surrounding areas.

Laura Ziegler / Twitter

With the rising incidence of terrorist attacks in recent years, concern is growing about potential threats to the nation’s food supply. Sponsors of a new federal law to address the risk of agro-terrorism talked with officials about best practices and policies on Friday, Aug. 21, in Kansas City.

It was a roundtable of military, political and academic officials who might find themselves responding to such a threat.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR

In the last few years, professional sports teams have begun to realize that noisy stadiums can be hard on people with autism and other special needs. Among them are the Kansas City Royals, whose front-office officials happen to include several fathers of such kids.

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