Kyle Palmer

Kyle Palmer is KCUR’s morning newscaster. He’s a former teacher, so getting up early is nothing for him. Before moving to the classroom, Kyle earned a Journalism degree from Mizzou and worked as a reporter for Columbia’s NPR affiliate KBIA. He also did play-by-play for the Jefferson City High School football and basketball teams. He earned a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a radio documentary about Missouri’s New Madrid fault (it’s still there, people, and ready to blow!).

He’s lived in Texas, California, and India, and also earned a Master’s degree in Education Policy from Stanford University, where he was also the PA announcer for the women’s and men’s volleyball team. (Ask him anything about volleyball.)

He now lives in Kansas with his wife. And they agree: of all the places they’ve lived, Kansas is the most…interesting. 

For the first time in half a century, the Kansas City Chiefs are going to the Super Bowl. 

The Chiefs beat the Tennessee Titans 35-24 at Arrowhead Stadium Sunday to win the AFC Championship, a year after falling just short in a heartbreaking overtime loss to the New England Patriots.

For Willie Vader, the Johnson County Courthouse can't be demolished soon enough. 

"That is the single biggest thing that could help downtown Olathe, what goes in there after that building comes down," Vader said. 

He owns Vader's Bar and Deli on Cherry Street, just east of the courthouse. The courthouse is nearly 70 years old and will be replaced by a bigger, more up-to-date one that's currently being built a block north. The new courthouse is expected to open in early 2021, and the plan is to tear the old one down shortly after. 

In the end, the votes weren't close. 

About a week before Christmas, the Prairie Village City Council uanimously approved an ordinance barring discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Two nights later, the Mission City Council approved a similar ordinance 7-1.

When Christopher Justice got a text message from a friend earlier this summer, he didn't know what it meant: "You're Twitter famous."

Justice had just graduated from Shawnee Mission East High School, and he was spending an uneventful few months working at a pizza place before heading off to college at Wichita State University. He didn't even have a Twitter account.

U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder, R-Kansas, is responding to a letter demanding he take action to end the Trump administration's policy of breaking up immigrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Nearly 60 elected officials from Johnson and Wyandotte Counties have called on Yoder to prevent immigrant children seeking asylum in the U.S. with their families from being separated from their parents at the border. Yoder is chairman of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee.

Andrea Ramsey for Congress

Retired lawyer and former community health nonprofit executive Andrea Ramsey announced Friday that she is dropping out of the race for Kansas' 3rd Congressional District.

k-state.edu

The FBI is now investigating an incident at Kansas State University this week as a hate crime. Racist slurs and threats were found scrawled on a car near campus. K-State president Richard Myers says the university is taking steps to ensure safety and security.

In a statement, Myers says K-State police will increase patrols on campus, and the university will review to see if it needs to add security cameras.

Myers says the graffiti should not “be allowed to create a culture of fear and divisiveness.” It’s just the latest racially charged incident to rock K-State.

The foster father of three Kansas sisters missing for nearly two months says they are welcome to return home.

Tonganoxie police announced this morning that Emily, Aimee, and Christin Utter had been found, and also that a 48-year-old man who had been named a "person of interest" in the case had been arrested.

The girls’ foster father, Terry Miller, says the girls have not been returned to his home but says he’s relieved they were found apparently unharmed.

Kansas Department of Corrections

Inmates turned over a tactical response vehicle, made weapons out of broken pieces of glass, and tried to run over a corrections officer with a commandeered cart, during a riot Tuesday night at the Norton Correctional Facility in north-central Kansas, according to a copy of the prison's log obtained by KCUR.

The threat posed by inmates was serious enough that, at one point, responding officers were told to use lethal force if necessary.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach requested voter data from all 50 states as part of his work on a presidential commission on voter fraud. In response, the ACLU of Kansas is considering its legal options, including a possible lawsuit.

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