Kansas Association of School Boards

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Kansas educators want lawmakers to act on health care, bullying and college credits when the Legislature convenes later this month.

For over a decade, the school funding battle has dominated any conversation about education in Topeka. But with a school funding plan in place, educators are no longer on the legal offensive. Instead, school lawyers have become watchdogs, making sure the Legislature keeps the education dollars flowing.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

A Kansas school boards group plans to oppose an education funding bill that it says likely won’t end a long-running court battle over how much the state spends.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service, File Photo

Gov. Laura Kelly’s school funding plan is headed to the full Senate for consideration. Though the proposal is advancing, a coalition of Kansas school districts has pulled its support.

file photo / Kansas News Service

Wichita Public School teachers are receiving a more than a 3.5 percent increase in salary. In Topeka, the increase is nearly 8 percent, that district's largest in 26 years.

School districts across Kansas are raising salaries, restoring cut positions and adding new jobs.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas schools already have the freedom to arm their teachers. Gov. Jeff Colyer now says bonuses for teachers who pack weapons might be in order.

Kansas News Service/File Photo

The former legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas thinks a practice among some school boards of restricting patron complaints at public meetings eventually will end up in court.

Doug Bonney, legal director emeritus for ACLU Kansas, said if barring complaints about school board members, the superintendent or employees is common, that doesn’t make it right.

Alberto G. / flickr Creative Commons

The results of the state's latest ACT test show the number of Kansas students who are college-ready is on the decline.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Tens of millions of dollars in extra state funding that legislators approved this spring amid pressure from an ongoing school finance lawsuit could go toward raising teacher pay.

Alberto G. / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas education officials are aiming for big improvements in academic outcomes by 2030.

State officials want a 95 percent high school graduation rate. The current rate is 86 percent. And they want even steeper gains in math and reading proficiency.

The Kansas Association of School Boards supports these goals but warns no state has achieved them, and to get there schools will need more resources.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers have the tall order of writing a new school funding formula this year. There’s already some agreement between the governor and the organization representing school boards: They don’t want the current funding system extended.

Kansas legislators threw out the old school funding formula in 2015 and replaced it with block grants set to expire this year.

Some lawmakers are concerned they might get bogged down writing a new formula and end up extending the block grants. Gov. Sam Brownback says he’s not in favor of that.

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