greenhouse gas

Crysta Henthorne / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Large industrial operations — think electrical power plants, oil refineries, ethanol facilities —cough carbon dioxide into the atmosphere by the ton. That, in turn, warms the planet.

But now some researchers think Kansas could be a good place to pump the gas underground rather than up in the air.

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service

New Trump administration rules aimed at protecting the coal industry reverse Obama-era regulations on greenhouse gases by letting states set their own rules.

That means Kansas regulators could clear the way for more coal, but economic trends have already driven a shift to natural gas and wind power.

UPDATE: Gov. Brownback Signs Emissions Reduction Plan

May 29, 2015
D1V1D, flickr Creative Commons

Governor Sam Brownback says federal regulators are moving too aggressively to reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants. The governor signed a bill yesterday requiring state agencies to craft a state plan and to resist federal efforts if necessary. More from Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean.

 

More from KHI News Service's Andy Marso:

D1v1d, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas House has advanced a bill to set up a greenhouse gas reduction plan.

The House advanced the measure on a voice vote on Tuesday and will take a final vote Wednesday.

The bill would direct the Kansas Department of Health and Environment to develop an emissions plan, and the Legislature's energy committees would be required to approve it.

The Environmental Protection Agency has directed states to develop stricter emissions standards by June of next year.

States without a suitable plan will have federal regulations imposed upon them.