census

TOPEKA, Kansas — When Gov. Laura Kelly signed a proclamation recognizing Hispanic Heritage Month in Kansas this week, she hailed the culture and diversity that Latinos bring to the state. She also gave a serious warning. 

If the state’s 350,000 Latinos don’t take part in the 2020 census, she said, Kansas could lose federal money and, potentially, representation in Congress.

Noah Fortson / NPR

President Trump is speaking from the White House about his administration's push to add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census. Watch his remarks live.

The USDA’s 2017 Ag Census recently revealed which congressional districts represent the most farm producers. 

It’s little surprise that the Midwest and Plains states dominate the top 20 slots. But the vast majority of U.S. House members have few farmers to answer to, compared to the rest of the people they represent. 

Updated on June 15

Why did Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, approve adding a hotly contested citizenship question to 2020 census forms?

The population of Kansas grew slightly in the last year, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The state’s population increased to 2,913,123, thanks to an additional 5,392 residents. That equals a 0.4 percent jump between July 1, 2016, and July 1, 2017.

Kansas remained the 35th-largest state in the country.

The Census Bureau said eight states lost population during that time period. Illinois lost the most residents, 33,703, while Wyoming had the largest percentage decline at 1 percent.

Idaho had the fastest rate of growth at 2.2 percent.