census

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The 2020 census count is set to end Sept 30, a month earlier than originally planned. That’s left census workers and advocates hurrying to get as many households to respond as possible – especially in communities that have historically been undercounted.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City area schools are making a final push to get families to fill out the 2020 census.

The census is critically important to schools, but a third of Kansans haven’t been counted yet. The U.S. Census Bureau has said it will stop counting a month early, on Sept. 30.

"When we don’t have an accurate census count, we have a harder time meeting the needs of all the children and families in the community," said J.C. Cowden, a pediatrician at Children’s Mercy Hospital involved in census outreach.

The impact of the 2020 Census is hard to overstate. According to a study by George Washington University, federal spending programs recently used 2010 Census data to distribute more than $1.5 trillion to state and local governments, nonprofits, businesses, and households nationwide.

But in much of Kansas and Missouri, the response so far has been underwhelming.

Amid a pandemic that has slowed efforts to count Americans, more than a third of Kansas households haven’t yet responded to the U.S. Census.

In some counties, especially in rural areas, less than half of the population has filled out the forms that help steer billions in federal dollars and resources to the state each year.

GARDEN CITY, Kansas — The census determines more than the number of congressional districts in a state. The number of responses impacts child care, too. 

Eighteen of Kansas’ 105 counties don’t have infant or toddler child care available, according to Child Care Aware Kansas. It uses census data to calculate the state’s child care needs, and every year, the demand grows. 

“Each year it just continues to really become a little bleaker — especially in rural areas,” said Leadell Ediger, executive director of Child Care Aware Kansas. 

TOPEKA, Kansas — When Gov. Laura Kelly signed a proclamation recognizing Hispanic Heritage Month in Kansas this week, she hailed the culture and diversity that Latinos bring to the state. She also gave a serious warning. 

If the state’s 350,000 Latinos don’t take part in the 2020 census, she said, Kansas could lose federal money and, potentially, representation in Congress.

Noah Fortson / NPR

President Trump is speaking from the White House about his administration's push to add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census. Watch his remarks live.

The USDA’s 2017 Ag Census recently revealed which congressional districts represent the most farm producers. 

It’s little surprise that the Midwest and Plains states dominate the top 20 slots. But the vast majority of U.S. House members have few farmers to answer to, compared to the rest of the people they represent. 

Updated on June 15

Why did Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, approve adding a hotly contested citizenship question to 2020 census forms?

The population of Kansas grew slightly in the last year, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The state’s population increased to 2,913,123, thanks to an additional 5,392 residents. That equals a 0.4 percent jump between July 1, 2016, and July 1, 2017.

Kansas remained the 35th-largest state in the country.

The Census Bureau said eight states lost population during that time period. Illinois lost the most residents, 33,703, while Wyoming had the largest percentage decline at 1 percent.

Idaho had the fastest rate of growth at 2.2 percent.