© 2021 KMUW
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Crime and Courts
00000179-cdc6-d978-adfd-cfc6d8a70001KMUW News will have live on-air and online coverage of local, state and congressional races on Election Day, Nov. 3. Listen from 7 to 11 p.m., follow KMUW on Facebook and Twitter, and visit KMUW.org for election results.Click here to locate your Election Day polling place if you want to vote in-person.Mail-in ballots must be returned by 7 p.m. on Election Day, Nov. 3, to the Sedgwick County Election Office, an Early Vote Center during voting hours, or a secure ballot drop box. If mailing, ballots must be postmarked by 7 p.m. on Nov. 3. ResourcesVote Local KS | You select the language, location and topics, and we’ll send you important election reminders via text message.B?u C? N?m 2020 | Election information offered in Vietnamese.Elección 2020 | Election information offered in Spanish.???????? 2020 | Election information offered in Arabic. ???????? ???? | Election information offered in Persian/Farsi.00000179-cdc6-d978-adfd-cfc6d8a90000KMUW's 2020 Election Blueprint is supported by the COVID-19 Connection Fund at the Wichita Community Foundation.

Kansas To Ask Supreme Court To Save Voter Citizenship Law

KSVoterRegistrationApplication_Koranda.jpg
Stephen Koranda
/
KPR/File photo

Kansas' Republican attorney general plans to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to allow the state to require new voters to provide papers documenting their citizenship when registering.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt announced Tuesday that he will appeal a 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision in April that said the state could not enforce a proof-of-citizenship law. An appeals-court panel said the law violated the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee of equal legal protection as well as a federal voter registration law.

The law was championed by former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a hard-right conservative, as a way to combat voter fraud. But both the appeals court and a federal judge in Kansas concluded that Kobach could show only a small potential for fraud that didn’t justify such restrictions on voting rights.

The Republican-controlled Legislature approved the law at Kobach’s urging in 2011 and it took effect in 2013.

Schmidt said in a statement Tuesday that as long as the law remains formally on the books it deserves "a full and robust legal defense."

"Voting is only for citizens, and this Kansas law is designed to confirm the citizenship of those registering to vote," Schmidt said.