Elle Moxley

Elle covers education for KCUR. The best part of her job is talking to students. Before coming to KCUR in 2014, Elle covered Indiana education policy for NPR’s StateImpact project. Her work covering Indiana’s exit from the Common Core was nationally recognized with an Edward R. Murrow award. Her work at KCUR has been recognized by the Missouri Broadcasters Association and the Kansas City Press Club. She is a graduate of the University Of Missouri School Of Journalism. Elle regularly tweets photos of her dog, Kingsley. There is a wounded Dr. Ian Malcolm bobblehead on her desk.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

More often than not, Republican incumbents in Johnson County are skipping what was once a mainstay of campaign season – the candidate forum.

I’m not talking about one or two no-shows. I’m saying the League of Women Voters invited every candidate in a contested primary to participate in a political meet and greet in June, but not one of 14 Republican incumbents showed up.

Their challengers did, but they didn’t.

Which begs the question: where are current lawmakers campaigning?

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Kansans who register to vote using a federal form at the Department of Motor Vehicles will have to provide proof of citizenship as a lawsuit plays out, a judge ruled Wednesday.

The League of Women Voters and other civil rights groups had sought a preliminary injunction to block such rules in Kansas, Alabama and Georgia.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Much of the credit for keeping Kansas schools open is going to Fairway Republican Rep. Melissa Rooker and other moderates who put forward a plan that didn’t reduce school aid.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

For the first time in more than 30 years, there's a Democrat running in every Senate district in Kansas. But their fellow left-leaning Kansans might not be voting for them in August.

That’s because some are so fed up with Gov. Sam Brownback, they’d rather switch parties to vote for a moderate Republican in the primary than allow the governor’s supporters to stay in the Legislature.

Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. has been sentenced to death for killing three people last spring at the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom.

The jury agreed that the shooting deaths of William Corporon, Reat Underwood and Terri LaManno qualified as a heinous crime for which  life in prison would be insufficient punishment.

Cross, who represented himself, had to be removed from the courtroom after launching into yet another anti-Semitic tirade.

A Johnson County jury will be back Tuesday to decide if convicted killer Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. will be sentenced to death for shooting three people last year.

Rather than risk having to sequester the jury over the holiday weekend, Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan dismissed them a little before 10 a.m. Friday, telling them to come back fresh next week.

Both prosecutors and Cross, who is representing himself, agreed it would be best to wait to send the case to the jury.

Assistant District Attorney Christopher McMullin opened the trial of accused Jewish Community Center shooter Frazier Glenn Cross Jr. Monday with a quote from the defendant shortly after his arrest.

"'I'm an anti-Semite,'" McMullin repeated, voice booming across the courtroom. "'How many goddamn Jews did I kill?' These are words captured on video as the defendant sat in the backseat of an Overland Park police car minutes after he killed three people."

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