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UPDATE: Taylor Files Petition With Kansas Supreme Court For Ballot Removal

Chad_Taylor_in_Parade.JPG
Carla Eckels
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Updated 09/10/2014, 11:00 a.m.

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Chad Taylor has filed a petition with the Kansas Supreme Court to get his name removed from the November 4th ballot.

Taylor filed his petition yesterday and named Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach as the defendant.

Kobach is the state's chief elections officer. He refused to take Taylor's name off the ballot, even though Taylor has ended his campaign.

Taylor was a candidate against three-term Republican Sen. Pat Roberts, but he announced last week he was ending his campaign in a move that boosted the chances of independent candidate Greg Orman.

Kobach ruled that Taylor failed to comply with state election laws by not stating in his withdrawal letter that he was incapable of fulfilling the duties of the office.

Updated 09/05/2014, 11:00 a.m.

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate for Kansas Chad Taylor says he will challenge a decision to keep his name on the November ballot, even though he wants to withdraw against incumbent Republican Pat Roberts.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach said on Thursday that Taylor did not comply with state law and formally declare that he would be unable to serve if elected.

Kobach said Taylor's only recourse is filing a lawsuit.

Taylor withdrew from the race Wednesday without explanation, potentially giving independent candidate Greg Orman a better shot at defeating the three-term conservative Roberts.

Taylor said in a statement that he was assured by a top Kobach aide that a letter he sent to the secretary of state's office was sufficient for withdrawing. Kobach said that is not the case.

Updated 09/04/2014, 5:30 p.m.

Chad Taylor, the Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate in Kansas must remain on the November ballot even though he wants to withdraw from his race against incumbent Republican Senator Pat Roberts.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach said Thursday Taylor did not comply with state law. He says Taylor didn't formally declare that he would be unable to serve if elected.

On Wednesday, Taylor withdrew from the race without explanation, raising questions about whether he quit to give independent candidate Greg Orman a better shot at defeating Roberts, who has struggled to solidify re-election support.

Updated 09/04/14, 12:30 p.m.

The Kansas Republican Party is questioning the legality of a Democratic nominee's withdrawal from the race against three-term GOP U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts.

Democrat Chad Taylor sent a letter to the Kansas secretary of state Wednesday saying he was withdrawing. He issued a separate statement saying he had terminated his campaign, without an explanation.

State GOP Chairman Kelly Arnold issued a statement Thursday questioning whether Taylor complied with a state law allowing nominees to withdraw.

The law says candidates may withdraw if they declare they are incapable of fulfilling the duties of the office.

The secretary of state's office still listed Taylor as a candidate on its website Thursday.

Roberts' campaign called Taylor's withdrawal a "corrupt bargain" between Democratic leaders and a viable independent candidate, Olathe businessman Greg Orman.

Original Story:

The Democratic candidate in the U.S. Senate race in Kansas has ended his campaign.

Democrat Chad Taylor had been running against three-term Republican incumbent Pat Roberts, and independent candidate Olathe businessman Greg Orman.

Taylor sent a letter Wednesday to Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach, withdrawing from the race.

Taylor issued a separate statement saying he made the decision after consulting with his staff, supporters and Democratic Party leaders. He did not give a reason.

Taylor is the district attorney in Shawnee County. He won the office in 2008 and was re-elected without opposition in 2012.

Fletcher Powell has worked at KMUW since 2009 as a producer, reporter, and host. He's been the host of All Things Considered since 2012 and KMUW's movie critic since 2016. Fletcher is a member of the Critics Choice Association.
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