Energy & Environment

Support for KMUW's energy and environment coverage comes from ITC Great Plains and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

kendura99 / flickr Creative Commons

The mission of WIRE or Wichita Initiative to Renew the Environment is to identify the priority concerns around the environment for citizens of Wichita and then help them engage in those types of activities.

The group recently created a two-minute animated video to encourage citizens to take advantage of recycling opportunities. 

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bborkos / flickr Creative Commons

The Wichita City Council adopted a new solid waste and recycling plan in November 2012 that requires all trash haulers to offer recycling services for items such as paper, plastic and aluminum.

In an effort to increase recycling, a new video has been released by WIRE, Wichita Initiative To Renew the Environment.

The two-minute animated video was created to encourage citizens to take advantage of recycling opportunities that are now available and address issues about recycling:

Kate Clause / KMUW

A new effort to roll back new green energy standards in Kansas utilities has stalled in the state Legislature. 

The House Energy and Environment Committee  tabled a bill today that would put off a requirement for utilities to generate at least 20 percent of its energy with renewable resources by the year 2020.  The tabled bill would rolled back the standard to 15 percent, not 20.

Westar Energy

Westar Energy advisers will be in Wichita Wednesday as part of an outreach program that helps low income Kansans fill out applications for assistance with home energy costs.

The Low-Income Energy Assistance Program or (LIEAP) is a federally funded program that helps eligible households pay a portion of their utility bills by providing a one-time per year benefit.

Westar Energy spokesperson Gina Penzig says advisers are helping customers in several cities in Kansas complete the application process.

Kansas senator expecting announcement on NBAF; Action expected on school funding formula; Gas explosion destroys restaurant in KC.

Sen. Roberts Anticipates NBAF 'Breakthrough'

The stalemate over federal funding for a state-of-the-art animal disease laboratory at Kansas State may soon be over.

More...

Panel OKs School Amendment

 Largest wind farm in Kansas now operational; Study finds racial disparities persist in state juvenile system; Senator Roberts no longer on ag panel; Lesser prairie chicken listed as threatened by federal agency.

States Largest Wind Farm Now Operational

The largest wind farm ever built in Kansas is now fully operational.

Nuala / Flickr

A wind energy tax credit is set to expire at the end of this year, but Gov. Sam Brownback is still holding out hope that lawmakers in Washington will extend the credit. He'd prefer to see it phased out more slowly over several years. Some critics of the credit have called it wasteful spending, but the governor says it's been the driving factor behind the wind industry in Kansas.

"I think they have a legitimate point of view, I just think it would be better off phasing it over four years," says Brownback.

Kansas jobless rate due out today; Judge says Kansas doctor does not have to post bond in abortion case; Childhood poverty task force is expected to meet today.

October Kansas Jobless Rate Due Monday

The Kansas Department of Labor is preparing to release a fresh look at the state's economy.

The agency says its report on October's unemployment rate will be announced Monday. The state's jobless rate has been on the way down recently, falling to 5.9 percent in September from 6.2 percent in August and 6.7 percent in September 2011.

Plant officials at Siemens Wind Energy in Hutchinson say new orders will help the company avoid more layoffs for now.

The plant recently received orders to supply parts for wind farms being built in Southern California and Chile.

Siemens announced in September that it was cutting 60 percent of its Hutchinson workforce. The layoffs were completed this week, leaving the plant with 150 workers.

It once had more than 400 employees. Siemens also laid off 570 people at its Fort Madison, Iowa, plant and 62 others around the country.

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