Wichita Journalism Collaborative

The Wichita Journalism Collaborative is an alliance of seven media organizations and three community groups, formed to support and enhance quality local journalism during the global pandemic and beyond.

In addition to KMUW, media partners include The Active Age, The Community Voice, The Journal (Kansas Leadership Center), KSN-TV, The Sunflower and The Wichita Eagle. Community partners committed to participating in the initiative include AB&C Bilingual Resources, The Elliott School of Communication at Wichita State University and Wichita Public Library.

The initiative launches with support from the Wichita Community Foundation and the Solutions Journalism Network.

Ways to Connect

Wichita State has prohibited professors from notifying their students if a classmate has tested positive for COVID-19 and may have unwittingly exposed fellow students.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Wichita’s mask requirement has been extended only until Oct. 21 — though it could end sooner than that.

COVID-19 Regulations A Stress On Nursing Home Residents, Families

Sep 8, 2020
cdc.gov

When Mary Malone turned 61, family members couldn’t come closer than the other side of a nursing home window.

Malone, a nanny and housekeeper described as the “glue” of her family, lay in a bed at Watercrest at Victoria Falls in Andover, a skilled nursing home and rehabilitation center that had been locked down because of the coronavirus pandemic. Her family erected a yard art scene outside her window.

“So this is what we have come to,” Malone’s niece, Jannette Malone Page, wrote about the experience at the time.

HUMBOLDT, Kansas — It might not be growing in population, but Humboldt in Allen County is one Kansas town that has defied the odds in other ways.

Drive around town and there is a coffee shop, a frame shop, a working 19th-century cabinet shop that makes high-end furniture, a shaved ice shop, a candy shop and four restaurants. As 2020 dawned, a family restaurant with a microbrewery and a new grocery store was in the offing, along with more building and construction, more businesses coming to town.

Wichita Eagle

In the race to find a COVID-19 vaccine, one of five major trials nationally will be conducted in collaboration with the KU School of Medicine-Wichita Center for Clinical Research along with more than 100 other testing sites nationally.

“We really do want to see if this vaccine is effective at preventing the spread of this disease,” said center director Tiffany Schwasinger-Schmidt, who is a physician and an assistant professor at the school.

Kylie Cameron

Wichita State is set to receive about $8.2 million in federal aid as reimbursement for its efforts to limit the spread of the coronavirus on campus.

As state universities prepare to start their fall semesters, the Kansas Board of Regents on Thursday approved two relief packages meant to curb the costs that come with additional safety measures. Fall classes will begin at WSU on Monday, with all courses either online or in a hybrid format — meaning partially online and partially in-person.

Courtesy

Most health experts continue to advise people to stay home to avoid catching Covid-19, or to maintain social distancing when out in public.

Lynn Hutchinson doesn’t have those options.

Getty Images

As employees have been heading back to work in person, they saw no restrictions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Sedgwick County for more than a month.

Courtesy photo

Sarrah Thornburg couldn’t wait to go to Pau, France, this fall.

As an international business major at Wichita State University, she is required to study abroad in order to graduate.

Thornburg was excited for the change in scenery and the weekend trips she’d take to Spain. That was before COVID-19 upended her schedule, and WSU was forced to cancel its study abroad programs.

Hugo Phan/KMUW

Many residents of a Clearwater nursing home where 11 deaths from COVID-19 are now being reported were not given baths for more than five weeks, its former director of nursing says.

Christine Zeller, a registered nurse with a master’s degree in nursing, described the lack of bathing as part of a pattern of substandard care caused by employee turnover and a shortage of equipment and supplies at Clearwater Nursing & Rehabilitation. She made the allegations in written testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee of the Kansas Legislature last week.

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