Wichita Eagle

Updated at 10:12 a.m. ET

The long slide in the U.S. newspaper industry took another dramatic turn Thursday.

Bo Rader / Wichita Eagle

About two decades ago the Wichita School Board, disturbed by an increasing number of guns, knives and other weapons being brought to schools, decided to take a hard-line approach:

Zero tolerance.

The board, prompted by the Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994, passed a policy mandating that any student caught with a gun — or a realistic-looking replica — on school property or at a school-sponsored event would be expelled for a full year.

No weapons — no questions, no excuses.

Courtesy photo

The Wichita Community Foundation has announced a $160,000 grant to help impact literacy in Wichita. The foundation will partner with the Wichita Eagle, the Wichita Public Library and Watermark Books & Cafe.

Impact Literacy is an initiative by the Wichita Community Foundation whose goal is to help increase academic readiness, success in the workforce and economic growth in the community.

Courtesy of The Wichita Eagle

The Wichita Eagle moved last week from downtown to Old Town.

Hear Aileen LeBlanc's interview with the paper's editor, Steve Coffman, about what's new for the well-established company, and watch a video tour of the paper's new home.

KMUW

Wichita Eagle publisher and president Roy Heatherly is leaving the company as part of a larger restructuring by the McClatchy Co.

Tony Berg, regional publisher for McClatchy's Midwest Division, announced Monday that Heatherly's last day will be May 5. Heatherly joined The Eagle in June 2015, returning to Wichita after a 37-year absence.

Berg said he will hire a general manager to lead The Eagle and its sales operations.

Cargill, Wikipedia Commons

Cargill announced today that it has selected the building currently housing the Wichita Eagle as its new headquarters.

The Wichita Eagle moved its printing operations to Kansas City earlier this year, and as a result the newspaper announced plans to downsize to a smaller building. In a news release, Cargill said that the property would be redeveloped into a newly constructed office complex accommodating about 800 people. Cargill says it has signed a letter of intent with a local investment group to acquire and develop the site, without disclosing the terms.