wheat

 

Even as more people bake during the pandemic, some wheat farmers may need help to break even this year.

MANHATTAN, Kansas — A bus filled with livestock industry representatives from South America, Australia, Africa and Europe drove past rows of pens and concrete feed bunks in central Kansas this week.

They held their phones and cameras up to the windows as a wave of cattle lifted their heads and stared back. Dump trucks full of feed shared the roads with cowboys on horses.

Half of the tour group, who had come to Kansas State University for the 9th Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock Conference, had never visited an industrial-sized feedlot.

After 13 years of work, a consortium of 200 scientists from 20 countries has released the first complete genome sequence for wheat. The discovery sets the stage for advances in a staple crop at a time when rising temperatures are beginning to threaten global production.

Dr. Romulo Lollato, Kansas State University

Wheat producers in Kansas are worried about the potential for freeze damage after temperatures stayed below freezing for much of the weekend.

While it’s not unusual for Kansas to see spring freezes, the frigid temperatures and blowing wind over the weekend likely caused some damage to the state's wheat crop.

Kansas Wheat's blog, The Wheat Beat

An odd thing has happened in wheat country — a lot of farmers aren't planting wheat.

Thanks to a global grain glut that has caused prices and profits to plunge, this year farmers planted the fewest acres of wheat since the U.S. Department of Agriculture began keeping records nearly a century ago.

Instead of planting the crop that gave the wheat belt its identity, many farmers are opting this year for crops that might be less iconic but are suddenly in demand, such as chickpeas and lentils, used in hummus and healthy snacks.

Farmers across the Midwest are planting less wheat. Harvest Public Media’s Jeremy Bernfeld explains why.

Worries about selling their wheat on the global market pushed U-S farmers to plant millions of fewer acres of wheat over the last two years. That’s according to a new government report.

Dan O’Brien, an economist at Kansas State University, says that has a lot to do with big supplies and a strong dollar.

Report: KS Corn Harvest Ahead Of Schedule

Sep 29, 2015
Jeff Engel, flickr Creative Commons

The corn harvest in Kansas is ahead of schedule, according to the latest report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Across Kansas, 42 percent of corn has already been harvested—way ahead of the 34 percent posted this time last year. The corn is currently rated at 3 percent very poor, 9 poor, 31 fair, 47 good, and 10 excellent.

But estimates released this month say total yields will about two percent less than last year.

krse.ksu.edu

Agriculture experts are warning farmers about a disease that could affect winter wheat planting in Kansas.

As Kansas winter wheat farmers begin to plant seeds this fall, a fungal disease called flag smut could be waiting to infect their future crops.

It was first detected in Rooks County in north-central Kansas back in May. The disease doesn’t affect plant quality, but can decrease yields.

Agrilife Today, flickr Creative Commons

The latest government update shows the 2015 winter wheat harvest is nearing completion in some parts of Kansas, and making good progress everywhere else.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service reported Monday that harvest statewide was 79 percent finished. That is ahead of the 66 percent cut at this time last year, but still behind the 83 percent average for this date.

http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/

Kansas weather conditions have been ideal this year for the development of wheat disease, including one that hasn’t been detected in Kansas since the 1930s.

Agricultural officials are contacting Kansas farmers with fields infected with flag smut disease and asking them to delay harvest and clean their equipment in an effort to contain its spread.

Beth Gaines with the Kansas Department of Agriculture says the disease has been detected at low infestation levels in 39 fields in central and western Kansas.

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