weather

United States Drought Monitor

Kansas' long drought is fading.

Drought covered more than 80 percent of Kansas in April. Now the National Weather Service says most of the state is drought-free.

Still, the dry conditions remain severe in parts of northeastern Kansas.

Kansas Highway Patrol

After receiving nearly 10 inches of rainfall Monday evening, parts of northwest Kansas experienced heavy flooding that damaged roads and caused a highway closure.

Flooding occurred along the Saline river, which rose four-and-a-half feet above its previous record height. The floods washed out smaller roads and temporarily closed Highway 283 north of Wakeeney.

Brian Grimmett

New research shows that Kansas is slowly seeing a shift in when it gets its rainfall during the year.

Depending on the region, Kansas typically receives between 35 percent and 41 percent of its annual precipitation during the summer months of June, July and August. But during the past 100 years, that trend is slowly shifting toward the spring.

Roy Anderson / Oklahoma Highway Patrol/Oklahoma Forestry Services

One year and nearly a half million torched acres after the Starbuck wildfire, strong winds blow across a parched Kansas landscape.

File/Reno County Fire District #6

Much of Kansas is under a Red Flag Warning from the National Weather Service for strong winds and dry conditions.

With the potential for dangerous grassland fires through Wednesday, forecasters elevated the fire danger levels in central and south-central Kansas to extreme and catastrophic categories.

Meteorologist Kevin Darmofal with the National Weather Service Office in Wichita says the dry winter and current conditions create a dangerous situation.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW, File Photo

Winter weather has created some slick and hazardous roads across Kansas. Walt Brinker, the author of "Roadside Survival," says the best way for motorists to avoid sliding off the road, or getting stuck in snow and icy conditions, is to stay home.

"If you do have to go out, you need to watch your speed—accelerate and decelerate very gradually and don't make any sudden stops," Brinker says. "If you can avoid stopping at stop lights by timing your driving so that you arrive as they turn green or while they're green, you'll be much further ahead than if you had to stop for a light."

Predictive Service, National Interagency Fire Center

For the third straight year, Kansans can expect a higher than average danger for wildland fire. 

COURTESY GARY MILLERSHASKI

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is offering disaster assistance to dozens of counties in western Kansas which were affected by a late spring snowstorm.

The storm dumped heavy snow, and straight-line winds up to 60 miles per hour created drifts and knocked downed power lines and trees. The snowstorm affected 27 counties, mainly in western and northwestern Kansas, from April 28 to May 3.

FEMA will reimburse state and local governments, agencies and nonprofits for recovery projects.

Paul Sableman / flickr Creative Commons

It's hot, and people who work outdoors in Wichita have to endure the sweltering heat, including city letter carriers. How are they keeping cool?

Teresa Rash manages Wichita’s downtown post office. She supervises 66 carriers and their 47 routes.

“They can be out there anywhere for 6 to 8 hours sometimes carrying mail. It puts their bodies through the ringers, so to speak," she says.

Rash says it's important for carriers to stay cool in hot weather.

Jim Crocker / flickr Creative Commons

As temperatures rise this summer, the Wichita Fire Department is warning people not to leave kids or pets in hot cars.

Even on mild days, the temperature inside of a car can climb to dangerous levels.

Wichita Fire Chief Ron Blackwell says every year, his team has to respond to reports of kids or pets being left in cars—sometimes it’s by accident, sometimes a parent just isn’t aware of the danger.

Pages