voter ID laws

Former Republican Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach rewrote the rules for voting in Kansas. Laws he pushed for required voters to show citizenship papers to register and ID at the polls. He secured prosecutorial powers for his office. 

Kobach’s term only ended a couple weeks ago, but some cornerstones of his legacy are already starting to crumble.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Republican candidate for Kansas governor Kris Kobach is defending President Trump’s proposal to end birthright citizenship through an executive order. Kobach has argued on cable news channels this week that the Constitution doesn’t guarantee citizenship to everyone born in the country.

Come in and sit down at Anita Parsa’s kitchen table. Help yourself to the chocolate chip cookies and she’ll get you an iced tea. Might as well make yourself comfortable.

Because for the next hour, she’s going to school you on a massive voter-tracking program run by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.  

“I like to figure out puzzles,” Parsa says. “I like to crack things, and that’s what this is all about.”

Are you registered to vote? CLICK HERE to check online. The deadline is July 17 if you want to vote in the Aug. 7 primaries.

With less than a month until the 2018 primaries, the question of whether Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is in compliance with a federal court order to fix its voter registration practices is still up for debate.

Kansas can no longer ask would-be voters to dig up documents like passports or birth certificates after a court ruled that unconstitutional and in violation of federal election law last month.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach will not represent himself during the appeal of a voting rights case in which he was ordered to undergo more legal education and was twice found in contempt of court.

Julie Denesha / KCUR/File Photo

A court filing asserts Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has complied with a court order finding the state's residents are not required to provide documentary proof of citizenship to register to vote.

Kobach told U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson there are no longer any registrations in suspense or cancelled for lack of citizenship documents.

The joint status report filed Sunday informs Robinson that Kobach is in full compliance with her order that all registrants receive the same information from county election offices and vote using the same poll books.

Dan Margolies / Kansas News Service, File photo

The ruling that struck down the state's proof-of-citizenship voter registration law leaves Kansas potentially on the hook to pay attorney's fees and costs for the winning side.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson granted Monday a joint request asking her to hold off awarding all fees and related expenses until appeals have been exhausted.

The parties contend a final amount will depend on the time spent on the appeal. It also notes attorneys are still verifying Secretary of State Kris Kobach's compliance with the latest ruling.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is defending Kansas' strict voter registration laws in federal court in a trial that has now entered its second week.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Some lawmakers said Monday that putting Kansas at the center of a database intended to root out voter fraud might eventually put it in the middle of a lawsuit if things go wrong.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Legal challenges to a Kansas law requiring proof of citizenship to register to vote are headed to trial next month.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Friday added additional days to a previously scheduled trial that begins March 6 in Kansas City, Kansas. The new schedule sets aside eight days for the bench trial.

American Civil Liberties Union sued Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach on behalf of the League of Women Voters and voters over the requirement that people produce a document such as a birth certificate or U.S. passport to register at motor vehicle offices.

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