newspapers

For more than 100 years, Eudora had a weekly newspaper.

“We were able to have a sports reporter, somebody that would come out when we had a structure fire and report on it,” said Mayor Tim Reazin, who moved to Eudora in 1997. “We had somebody that sat through the city commission meetings with us.”

But since 2004, more than 1,800 newspapers have folded, a third of them in rural communities. Eudora residents lost their paper in 2008. Reazin says the result is citizens are less informed – and starved for coverage.

The Kansas Historical Society says its Kansas Digital Newspapers program has partnered with Newspapers.com to provide online access to several million pages of Kansas newspapers from the Historical Society's collection.

The initial partnership will focus on Kansas newspapers published 1854 - 1922 and includes almost five million pages.

The KHS's collection holds nearly every newspaper published in Kansas from 1854 to the present. The digital newspapers program seeks to digitize and share electric versions of Kansas newspapers.

Briana O'Higgins / KMUW

A new, or not so new, weekly newspaper hits Wichita streets Thursday. F5 returns after a six year hiatus under the direction of founder Mike Marlett.

Marlett says he decided to start the paper back up again after constantly hearing from people that missed it.

“I met some young, successful guys with their own businesses and their own money to invest,” he says. “They had brand loyalty and they wanted it back.

Carla Eckels

Dozens took part in a lecture Wednesday on African-American newspapers and communities in Kansas at the Wichita Public Library downtown.

Historian Aleen Ratzlaff, professor of communications at Tabor College in Hillsboro, says Kansas has a rich history of newspapers that were owned and published by African-Americans and targeted to black readers.

"The emphasis has been on mainstream newspapers, but there were vital publications that were part of the African-American community as well as other ethic communities," he says.

Legislators move forward on school funding amendment; Historian gives lecture on Kansas Black newspapers; Historic site offers travel scholarships to teachers.

Work Starts On School Funding Change

A Senate committee started working on a constitutional amendment to block lawsuits over school funding. The proposal would alter the Kansas Constitution to say only the Legislature can set school spending levels.

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