Local News

Neighborhood Movement / Facebook

The Wichita South Central Neighborhood Plan is unveiling its new initiatives at an event this weekend.

The South Central Neighborhood Plan Pop-Up Event is on Saturday, July 20, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the SoCe Neighboring Movement office, 417 E. Gilbert St. It is free to the public.

The Neighboring Movement is seeking input on the plan it will be presenting.

GARDEN CITY — Three years ago, rancher and farmer Jay Young got intrigued by a YouTube video.

A North Dakota farmer championed the idea of cover crops — plants that would be considered weeds in many other contexts — as robust plants for his cattle to graze on.

Young applied the cover crop strategy – rotating rye, radishes, turnips, oats and barley – to his land just east of the Colorado border. The plants held the soil in place, trapped nutrients in the ground and made the ground nicely spongy.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Electric scooters have hit the streets of Wichita.

Mayor Jeff Longwell held a small ribbon-cutting ceremony on Monday morning at the corner of Second and Main streets, officially launching the program.

"This new method of transportation will add vibrancy to our downtown, and it'll make getting around a little easier," Longwell said.

Transit director Mike Tann says that 500 scooters were deployed Monday around the downtown area, but more than 1,100 will be available over the next few weeks.

TOPEKA — They’re here in Kansas. CBD products with a bit of that oh-so-taboo THC in them. To vape, to put under your tongue.

Some retailers argue those products became legal on July 1 because of tweaks to state regulation of cannabis-related substances in a bill supporting the state’s fledgling industrial hemp program.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly on Thursday dropped a policy that allowed several thousand Kansas adults to keep receiving food assistance after failing to meet a work requirement, reversing course days after the state's Republican attorney general threatened to file a lawsuit.

Courtesy photo

Fifteen young authors will sign books as part of a summer reading camp that teaches children how to write, illustrate and publish their own books.

The books include stories about making new friends, good grades and a comical ghost search.

Third- and fourth-graders worked with Arts Partners, educators and graduate students from Wichita State University's creative writing department to create the books.

Prisca Barnes is founder and CEO of Storytime Village, the nonprofit that hosts the camp.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Cursive handwriting is no longer a necessity in school or daily life. But the fancy flowing script will always have a connection to history, and being able to read cursive remains an important skill.

That’s why the Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum is teaching cursive writing to young people. The museum offers free penmanship workshops throughout the year.

Courtesy photo

The Cosmosphere and Exploration Place will hold events this month to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

KANSAS CITY, Kansas — Many people figure vaping spares their health because it lets them inhale nicotine in aerosols instead of sucking in smoke from burning cigarettes.

New research from the University of Kansas casts doubt on that, raising the specter that vaping nicotine may cause some of the same respiratory problems that plague and even kill smokers today.

Crews are hard at work at Kansas City International Airport tearing down Terminal A and recycling its components to make way for a new, greener single terminal.

There have been no explosions, no big building collapse — and for good reason, says deputy director Justin Meyer.

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