Kansas Supreme Court

Larry Darling, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas House has had its say on school finance -- putting the ball in the Senate’s court. But Senate leaders say they won’t move forward on increasing K-12 funding to satisfy the Kansas Supreme Court without a deal to prevent schools from suing again in the future.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Republicans in the Kansas House couldn’t win enough votes Monday to increase school funding by hundreds of millions of dollars. Conservatives in their own party thought it was too much money; Democrats said it was too little.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

Now that Republican leaders have a report they commissioned on school funding, it’s not clear they’ll pursue its recommendations to spend more for better student performance.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service/File photo

Imagine, teacher Shauna Hammett tells first-graders gathered around a small table, a train whistle.

Kansas News Service/File photo

The Kansas Supreme Court could soon decide whether there’s a right to abortion in the state constitution.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Tenure, as Kansas public school teachers had known it for decades, died at the hands of lawmakers without a hearing in the spring of 2014.

No one disputes that.

On Wednesday, state and teachers union lawyers went head-to-head before the Kansas Supreme Court over whether the ending of those long-standing job protections ran afoul of the state and U.S. constitutions.

CHARLIE RIEDEL-ARCHIVE PHOTO / Associated Press

In the summer of 2005, the Legislature butted heads with the Kansas Supreme Court over a ruling that ordered an influx of money to public education.

The result? Kansas came closer than ever to a constitutional crisis.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Kansas lawmakers began groundwork Monday for their response to the Kansas Supreme Court’s order to fix school finance by this spring. The same day, a Hiawatha senator announced he will seek to curb the court’s powers through a constitutional amendment.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

The Kansas Supreme Court is divided over whether a law requiring criminal offenders to register with local authorities after prison represents extra punishment.

A 4-3 majority has concluded that registration for sex, drug and violent offenders is not extra punishment. Its latest decision came Thursday in the appeal of Djuan Richardson.

He was convicted of selling cocaine in Sedgwick County in 2003 and pleaded guilty to violating the offender registration law in 2011. He later sought unsuccessfully to withdraw that plea.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Updated at 9:22 a.m. Tuesday

Kansas lawmakers soon will start work to determine their response to a ruling by the state’s Supreme Court that found K-12 public school funding unconstitutional.

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