Kansas State Department of Education

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File Photo

Gov. Sam Brownback wants to add hundreds of new counselors to public schools in Kansas over the next five years, if those counselors can be found.

KSDE/via Twitter

The Wellington School District is hosting a town hall Wednesday night regarding its efforts to redesign the way it serves students at two schools.

Sam Zeff / Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas set lofty goals for its public schools in the next dozen years – but the Trump administration and independent experts suggest the state’s plan is as vague as it is ambitious.

Larry Darling, flickr Creative Commons

A state report has found that the Kansas Department of Education has illegally provided millions of dollars to some school districts.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Kansas school districts and municipalities are rushing to save millions of dollars before the Republican tax plan makes that impossible.

Courtesy photo

Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer continues to shape top levels of Kansas government amid anticipation that the U.S. Senate may soon confirm Gov. Sam Brownback for an ambassadorship at the State Department.

Josh Harbour / Garden City Telegram

Children who come from low-income families, have disabilities, aren’t white or don’t speak English at home appear to be disproportionately paying the price of Kansas’ teacher shortage, according to an analysis by the Kansas News Service.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Kansas’ approach to implementing a federal law on equity in education would fail to promote achievement for thousands of students the law was meant to protect, civil rights advocates say.

Lydia Liu

Kansas has received a federal grant worth $27 million to promote student literacy in schools across the state.

The grant is part of the U.S. Department of Education’s “Striving Reader Comprehensive Literacy Initiative,” which works to build literacy skills from birth through 12th grade. The program focuses in particular on English Language Learners and students with disabilities.

Celia LLopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas education officials did little to promote a public comment period for a school accountability plan designed to steer the state through 2030 and guide nearly $2 billion in federal spending.

While some states that publicized town halls and launched online surveys for their plans collected comments by the thousands, Kansas officials didn’t use such tools nor issue news releases or social media posts about the state’s public comment period.

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