Kansas Board Of Regents

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

The Kansas Board of Regents selected Wichita State University provost Rick Muma as the university's interim president.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Former Wichita State University President Jay Golden agreed to limit his presence on campus, move out of his in-campus house by Sunday and stay on the university payroll.

That’s according to a letter the Kansas Board of Regents sent to Jay Golden outlining some of the terms for his resignation. KMUW received the letter Wednesday from the Regents.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW/File photo

Wichita State University President Jay Golden has resigned, according to a statement by the Kansas Board of Regents released Friday.

“We are appreciative of his hard work and dedication to the university and are grateful for his commitment to serving students,” Regents Chair Bill Feuerborn said in the statement. “We wish him well in all his future endeavors.”

J. Schafer / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

The Kansas Board of Regents approved tuition hikes for four state universities, while the University of Kansas and Kansas State University held their tuition flat.

KU announced its plans not to raise tuition last month, saying the school needs to stay competitive. But it also said it wasn't right to raise tuition as students and their families deal with lost jobs and income caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

K-State gave similar reasons.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

The Kansas Board of Regents met with Wichita State University President Jay Golden on Wednesday, but took no action over the furor caused by Golden removing a prerecorded message by Ivanka Trump from WSU Tech’s commencement ceremony.

The Regents spent more than four hours in executive session with Golden. They then adjourned and directed people watching the virtual meeting to a statement.

The statement read:

Stephan Bisaha

Wichita State University plans to tear down Cessna Stadium.

The Kansas Board of Regents gave WSU permission on Wednesday to demolish the 30,000-seat football stadium, more than 30 years after the school ended its football program.

The stadium is currently best known as the site for the Kansas State High School Track and Field Championships. Billed as the largest high school track and field meet in the country, it brings thousands of athletes from across Kansas to Wichita.

Kansas News Service / Celia Llopis-Jepsen

WICHITA, Kansas — The good news for Kansas public colleges: 1,000 more Latino students will be enrolled a decade from now, enough to fill the seats left empty by fewer white students.

The bad news? The state predicts fewer students will earn a degree or certification in 2029, judging by Kansas’ poor track record in graduating Latino students.

When Dan Hoyt started graduate school at the University of Kansas in 2016, he knew he had anxiety and depression. He worried about being able to find a job after graduation. And, sometimes, he couldn’t get through his assigned reading.

“When you have anxieties, that gets impossible,” he said. “I'll think about the same things over and over and over again.”

But when he reached out to KU’s counseling services, he was told he had to wait five months before he could get an appointment with a therapist at the Lawrence campus. And getting there from KU’s Overland Park campus, where he took classes, complicated things.

Chris Neal / For the Kansas News Service

Every college in Kansas is more expensive today than it was a decade ago.

Tuition and fees haven’t gone up every year — this year, the Kansas Board of Regents convinced most of the state’s universities to hold tuition flat — but that doesn’t change how expensive college has become.

The Kansas Board of Regents voted Wednesday to change the benchmarks for in-state students to attend the state’s six public universities, and class-rank requirements are out.

The move is meant to increase the number of Kansas high schoolers who are eligible to attend Kansas State University, Emporia State University, Pittsburg State University, Fort Hays State University, Wichita State University and the University of Kansas. 

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