Gordon Parks

Wichita Eagle

From interactive Bitmoji classrooms to virtual zoo field trips and online tutoring sessions that double as social hours, the students and teachers of Gordon Parks Academy (GPA) have had to get creative this semester to preserve their sense of community.

Bonds run deep at the north-Wichita magnet school, which serves a diverse student body of roughly 350 pupils ranging from pre-K to eighth grade.

"We have kids who've been here since they were in kindergarten, so there's this sense of family with our students and our teachers and our staff," said Principal LaTonia Kennedy.

Before Cassius Clay took the name Muhammad Ali, he was a 22-year-old who’d been rechristened “the champ,” the greatest boxer in the world.

Long-time Life magazine photojournalist and renaissance man Gordon Parks was assigned to cover the young man twice, once in 1966 and again in 1970. What Parks found after many meetings was a 24-year-old with bruised fists looking for approval — a side of the superstar the public hadn't seen.

Gordon Parks Collection, Special Collections & University Archives, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas.

The landmark motion picture "The Learning Tree" turns 50 years old this year. Noted photographer Gordon Parks directed the movie, based off his 1963 semi-autobiography. The film is set in Parks’ hometown of Fort Scott, Kansas. Parks became the first African-American to produce and direct a major motion picture for a Hollywood studio.

Special Collections & University Archives at Pittsburg State University

It's been nearly a decade since Wichita State University acquired the 100-box collection of famed photographer, writer and director Gordon Parks.

His son David Parks visited KMUW last week and says he's pleased that researchers are delving into his dad's work.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW

Three museums in Wichita are displaying the work of artist Gordon Parks starting this month. A notable author, filmmaker and musician, the Kansas native is most famous for his photographs, which documented poverty and segregation during the civil rights movement.. 

Gordon Parks: A Celebration of Life and Work

Jan 20, 2016
Courtesy of and © The Gordon Parks Foundation

This winter, you have many opportunities to learn more about Kansas photographer Gordon Parks.

Courtesy photo

The Ulrich Museum at Wichita State University has acquired a significant collection (125) fine art photographs by Kansas native, Gordon Parks.

Gordon Parks was born in Fort Scott Kansas in 1912. He was drawn to photography when he saw images of migrant workers in a magazine.

He became a photojournalist who concentrated on social issues such as race relations, poverty and civil rights. He also documented the career of Mohammed Ali, the work of Malcolm X, Adam Clayton Powell and Stokley Carmichael.

Ulrich Museum / Wichita State University

Friday marks the centennial of the birth of photographer, composer, filmmaker and author Gordon Parks.

Celebrations have been held across the country in his honor, including several events at Wichita State University. Parks' third wife, Genevieve Young, spoke Thursday at Wichita State, which houses Parks' personal papers.

Young was former senior editor at Little Brown and Company and vice president of Bantam Books. She edited Gordon Parks' writings.

Top Morning News 11.30.12

Nov 30, 2012

The state is expected to release new tax revenue numbers today; A Juvenile Justice Official says the facility in Topeka has improved after issues of security arose earlier this year; WSU hosts Gordon Parks' third wife in honor of his 100th birthday.

State Tax Report Out Friday

The Kansas Department of Revenue is preparing to issue a report on whether state tax collections in November met expectations.

Art Review: Ulrich Reopening

Sep 19, 2012
Ulrich Museum of Art

The Ulrich Museum exuberantly reopened last weekend with a refreshed space that may appear the same, but is actually full of major upgrades that really make the space feel polished. But the delight of the Ulrich reopening begins well before entering the gallery space.

The Ulrich’s huge yarn bomb effort can been seen campus-wide and is a tremendous success. Even though I was skeptical about the concept of sanctioned graffiti, this project convinced me that yarn bombing, authorized or not, will always be delightful.

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