flooding

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service

The month of May was an all-timer in Kansas, as sites across the state recorded rain on all but two days. The deluge broke state and local rainfall records as well as setting several high water marks in Kansas’ rivers, streams, and reservoirs.

Overflowing rivers and reservoirs across Kansas are already producing significant flooding, particularly in the southeast corner of the state.

But, forecasters say, things could get much worse over the next several days as slow-moving thunderstorms develop over central and northeast Kansas.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

Communities along the Ninnescah River in western Sedgwick County are watching closely for possible flooding due to water releases at Cheney Reservoir.

Missouri River overflowing its banks
Andrea Tudhope/KCUR 89.3

Major flooding on stretches of the Missouri River from Nebraska and Iowa through Kansas and Missouri resulted in several breached levees and significant damage to cities, towns, and farmland in March. Forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say the threat of even more flooding isn’t over yet.

Farmers along the Missouri River and its tributaries are still assessing damage from recent flooding.

But beyond the farms in parts of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri and Kansas, there’s visible evidence that the impacts are far-reaching and long-lasting — closed interstates and rerouted trains — key cogs in a global agriculture economy.

Brian Grimmett

Kansas experienced its 23rd-wettest year on record in 2018, according to weather data that goes back as far as 1895. 

Brian Grimmett

Kansans can expect rising temperatures and more extreme flooding in the future, according to the latest National Climate Assessment.