Federal Aviation Administration

The Federal Aviation Administration is getting closer to allowing Boeing's troubled 737 Max commercial jetliner to fly passengers again.

FAA chief Stephen Dickson says his agency "is in the final stages of reviewing the proposed changes to the Boeing 737 Max," adding that the agency could complete its evaluation of the fixes "in coming days" and allow the plane to return to service. Reuters is reporting that the plane could be recertified by the FAA as soon as Nov. 18.

The Federal Aviation Administration is ordering emergency inspections of about 2,000 Boeing 737 airplanes because of a possible engine valve problem that could lead to engine failure.

The FAA's emergency air worthiness directive orders inspections of older 737 Classic and Next Generation planes that may have been in storage as a result of sharply reduced air travel demand during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Boeing

After nearly three years of testing, Boeing’s KC-46 tanker program has completed its final Federal Aviation Administration certification, the company said in a news release Wednesday.

 

The certification was one of the last major hurdles standing between the KC-46 and its delivery to McConnell Air Force Base.

 

The first tanker is expected to be delivered to McConnell next month.

 

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File Photo

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas updated civic and business leaders on Monday on federal issues he’s facing during a forum in Wichita.

One topic was the effort to privatize the nation’s air traffic controllers, something Moran opposes.

The senator said privatizing the world's most complex air system is nothing more than a solution without a problem that will ultimately create more problems.

He said smaller airports and travelers will be hurt by the privatization effort. He’s advocating for proposals that would protect general aviation and small airports.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File Photo

Republican U.S. Senator Jerry Moran visited Wichita Friday to bring attention to what he calls a “damaging” proposal to privatize air traffic control operations.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

The people who provide weather observations at Wichita’s Eisenhower National Airport could be out of a job if Congress approves President Trump’s budget proposal.

The Federal Aviation Administration wants to eliminate the Contract Weather Observer program at Eisenhower and other airports to save about $50 million.

Wikipedia

Congressman Ron Estes of Kansas wants to protect the needs of general aviation when it comes to President Trump’s plan to privatize the nation’s air traffic control system.

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran is concerned that the plan will hurt small airports.

The president says the reforms would modernize the system and make it safer and more reliable.

Estes said in a statement that he shares President Trump’s desire to improve travel in the U.S. but also wants the plan to protect the needs of general aviation.

Eisenhower National Airport Facebook

An aviation bill working its way to President Obama will keep an airport weather reporting program in place at Wichita’s Eisenhower National Airport through fiscal year 2017.

The legislation keeps the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) from terminating the Contract Weather Observer (CWO) program at Eisenhower and 56 other mid-size airports until the agency does a thorough review of the issue.

Wikipedia

The Contract Weather Observer Program at Wichita’s Eisenhower National Airport will continue, at least through the fiscal year 2017.  

The U.S. Senate approved legislation Tuesday that includes a mandate to prevent the Federal Aviation Administration from terminating the program at 57 airports, including Eisenhower.

The FAA launched a plan about a year ago to eliminate the Contract Weather Observer program at those targeted airports, and move to a system where air traffic controllers would monitor the weather and rely on information from automated sensors.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

When local aircraft manufacturers need to complete testing on the effects of lightning on their materials and components, they used to have to travel to a lab on the East or West Coast.

Now, they can stay in Wichita.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar takes us inside Wichita State University’s new lightning test lab.

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