Emporia State

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service file photo

WICHITA, Kansas — Gone are the days of sneaking late into a crowded lecture hall. Reading college students' disapproving faces won't be easy. And Thanksgiving is the new Christmas.

There’ll be a lot of adjustments this fall for students and professors at Kansas’ universities, institutions that have been finalizing plans for how they’ll keep everyone safe from the coronavirus when in-person instruction returns.

James Ehlers

WICHITA, Kansas — Educators say there was a silver lining when Kansas schools and campuses had to shut down because of the coronavirus: It was a chance to learn how to do remote learning right.

Now with college finals submitted and most K-12 schools in summer vacation mode, educators are reflecting on those two months of online teaching, especially knowing that some universities will have to do it again come fall (Wichita State plans online-only instruction after Thanksgiving).

Here are six things that Kansas professors and teachers say they’ve learned outside of the physical classroom.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service file photo

For decades, a university education meant students had to load up on math, history and English courses. Now, Kansas universities are slashing those general education requirements so more students can graduate on time and have more room for classes in their major.

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

To get the best college experience, live on campus.

Wichita State University / Facebook

Tuition at public universities in Kansas is going up. School officials blame the increase on rising costs and years of dwindling state funding alongside flat enrollment.

The hikes all fall below the 3.1 percent average increase for state universities across the nation last year. Still, most Kansas public universities received increases above the nation’s inflation rate of about 2 percent.

J. Schafer / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

new estimate from the Emporia State Economic Index shows Kansas’ economy started to level off in October. 

The GDP for the state shrank slightly by 0.1 percent from September. That follows months of strong growth after a low point in March. There is some positive news: Kansas' GDP grew 1.7 percent since October 2016.

AgriLife Today, flickr Creative Commons

Three Kansas schools are teaming up to create a post-secondary degree program focused on using small unmanned aerial systems, or drones, in agriculture.

The goal is to improve the technical and analytical skill sets of the next generation of farm managers, technicians and crop advisors.

Fort Hayes State University is partnering with Hutchinson Community College and Emporia State University to develop curricula focused on the use of drones in precision agriculture.

A fine-arts degree program that Emporia State University says is unique in the country is being enhanced with a gift from the company that helped start the program.

The university partnered with Emporia-based Glendo Corporation in 2005 to establish a four-year degree program in engraving arts. Glendo produces a range of engraving tools that are sold in more than 100 countries.

Kansas Regents Approve Room And Board Increases

Dec 20, 2012

Students at the state's six universities will pay more for room and board next year.

The Kansas Board of Regents approved rate increases for all six state schools Wednesday.

Wichita State students will see 3.5% increase in their room and board.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that increases are needed to cover rising operating expenses and to continue making facilities improvements.

Emporia State students will see the highest increase--3.7 percent--and Fort Hays State students will only pay a little over 1% more for room and board.

Despite a strong hand in the development of the practice, Kansas does not offer a license to art therapists. But the art therapy faculty at Emporia State University are trying to change that.

In 2001 attempt by the Kansas Art Therapy Association to get support for a licensure bill failed.

Legislators told the Kansas Art Therapy Association they needed 100 board certified art therapists practicing in the state for them to consider licensure.

But, says Emporia State University faculty member Libby Schmanke, they just can’t seem to get close to that number.