Donald Trump

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump is delivering his State of the Union address, which the White House says will outline a "policy agenda both parties can rally behind." Yet the speech follows the longest shutdown in U.S. history, and the deadline to avoid another one is in less than two weeks.

NPR reporters covering the White House, Congress, immigration, national security and more are annotating his remarks live, adding context and analysis.

Pete Souza

President Trump is delivering a State of the Union address after a delay due to the government shutdown. Watch his speech live, followed by a Democratic response delivered by former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.

He’ll cringe when he reads this but, Republican U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran is part of “the resistance.”

Not always in obvious ways. Moreover, not in ways that come close to comforting those who view President Donald Trump as a clear and present danger to the nation.

But in his own quiet, Kansas way Moran resists the chaos of Trump’s Washington by advocating for a return to “regular order” in the U.S. Senate and the nation.

Different in style but still much like his late colleague, Sen. John McCain of Arizona.

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump is addressing the nation about border security tonight. Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Charles Schumer will give a joint response immediately following. The government is partially shut down, with Trump in a stalemate with Democrats over funding for a wall along the southern border.

Watch his remarks and the Democratic response live here:

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Mike Pompeo, the U.S. Secretary of State and a former Kansas congressman from Wichita, spoke about some of the key issues he is dealing with as the country’s leader of foreign policy during a brief interview Thursday with KMUW. 

President Donald Trump visited Kansas City, Missouri, Friday to speak at a national conference for Project Safe Neighborhoods, a Justice Department initiative that aims to partner local and federal officials in order to reduce violent crime.

At the Westin Kansas City at Crown Center, a crowd of hundreds of law enforcement officials and prosecutors from around the country greeted the president with warm applause, dozens of cell phones popping up in the air to capture his entrance.

Kris Kobach
Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s loss in the race for governor at least heightens the possibility that he may join President Donald Trump’s administration.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Republican candidate for Kansas governor Kris Kobach is defending President Trump’s proposal to end birthright citizenship through an executive order. Kobach has argued on cable news channels this week that the Constitution doesn’t guarantee citizenship to everyone born in the country.

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service

At a campaign rally in Topeka earlier this month, the tough talk on immigration from Republican gubernatorial nominee Kris Kobach was a crowd pleaser.

“We’ve worked on a number of things, but the most important is stopping illegal immigration,” Kobach said to a cheering audience.

Kobach was standing next to President Donald Trump, who had kind words for the Kansas secretary of state, who’s advised the president on immigration and proposed wording for a citizenship question on the 2020 census.

President Donald Trump is coming to Kansas this weekend, and some Republican candidates are hoping that will provide them a boost. That includes the Republican newcomer running for Congress in the 2nd District, who’s fending off more questions about his background, and Secretary of State Kris Kobach. Meanwhile, Kobach's Democratic opponent in the governor's race, state Sen. Laura Kelly, is trying to tie him to former Gov. Sam Brownback.  

Jim McLean, Stephen Koranda, and Madeline Fox of the Kansas News Service discuss whether any of it will sway voters.


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