Coronavirus

cdc.gov

TOPEKA — Doses from Kansas’ first shipment of a COVID-19 vaccine were arriving Thursday in rural Kansas for hospitals to administer to health care workers, though the state expects its second shipment to be smaller than anticipated.

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The co-owner of two Wichita music venues testified before Congress on Tuesday that his industry "desperately" needs help.

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Consider the mounting money problems facing public universities in Kansas.

Decades of ballooning tuition have made students and their families increasingly worried about college debt. Tech schools offer cheaper faster paths to a solid job. Help from taxpayers has waned.

Then came the pandemic. Campuses had to spend heavily to retool for safety during the outbreak. Still, large numbers of students and the money they would have spent on dorms, tuition and the like stayed away.

Wichita Eagle

Health care workers in Wichita were among the first in the state to get the new COVID-19 vaccination.

Five employees of the Ascension Via Christi health system received shots at St. Francis Hospital Monday.  The hospital says a critical care nurse, a housekeeper for a COVID-19 unit and a respiratory therapist were among those who were vaccinated.  Frontline health workers at other Ascension Via Christi facilities in Kansas will receive the vaccination later this week.

El Alvi / Flickr Creative Commons

TOPEKA — Kansas does not plan to send personal information to the federal government about residents who receive coronavirus vaccines, though it has signed a data-use agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — The way kids in Kansas learn to read is in for a major rewrite.

Teachers will soon ditch their time-worn old memorize-and-context-clues methods. In their place, they’ll work with state teacher colleges on new styles meant to accommodate dyslexic students and other children who struggle with books. For instance, they’ll train kids to break down words and to methodically drill through English’s tricky rules.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment

WICHITA, Kansas — The number of Kansans who have died from COVID-19 topped 2,000 on Friday after the state announced 131 new deaths.

How quickly the state passed that milestone — it took the state seven-plus months to lose its first 1,000 people to the coronavirus, and little more than a month to lose 1,000 more — shows how quickly the spread is accelerating.

“There’s just so many more people getting COVID right now that inevitably that’s going to lead to more death,” said Steve Stites, chief medical officer at the University of Kansas Health System.

The Range | Dec. 11, 2020

Dec 11, 2020
Lu Anne Stephens / KMUW

This week on The Range, we take a trip to western Kansas to visit the breathtaking "Cathedral of the Plains" that towers over the tiny town of Victoria.

Plus, we catch up with Lynn Hutchinson, a COVID-19 ICU nurse at St. Francis Hospital we first spoke to in July, to hear what the situation is like now, ten months into the pandemic.

Courtesy

When we last talked with Lynn Hutchinson, a nurse working the COVID-19 intensive care unit at Ascension Via Christi St. Francis, it was July, and Sedgwick County was in the middle of its first big coronavirus wave.

"I think the last time I talked to you, I remember saying I wish I could get on my roof and yell, 'Wear your mask!'" Hutchinson recalled.

"Well, I apparently didn't yell loud enough."

Watch: Remote Learning Q&A

Dec 10, 2020

The Wichita Journalism Collaborative recently convened a panel of education experts to talk about remote learning and the best ways to keep students engaged, emotionally healthy and learning while attending classes remotely.

The panel included:

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