climate

Brian Grimmett

Kansas experienced its 23rd-wettest year on record in 2018, according to weather data that goes back as far as 1895. 

Niccolo Ubalducci / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas is about to make it through the end of April without a tornado for only the fourth time since record keeping began.

Dr. Romulo Lollato, Kansas State University

Wheat producers in Kansas are worried about the potential for freeze damage after temperatures stayed below freezing for much of the weekend.

While it’s not unusual for Kansas to see spring freezes, the frigid temperatures and blowing wind over the weekend likely caused some damage to the state's wheat crop.

AgriLife Today, flickr Creative Commons

The latest drought report shows that all of Kansas is drying out, with the southern parts of the state now being considered in extreme drought.

But what impact could this weather pattern have if it sticks around?

More than 50 percent of the state is currently seeing drought conditions, up from only 1.5 percent three months ago. And assistant state climatologist Mary Knapp says the outlook for the next three months isn't much better.

Predictive Service, National Interagency Fire Center

For the third straight year, Kansans can expect a higher than average danger for wildland fire. 

Kendi Paet, flickr Creative Commons

To no one's surprise, some Kansas areas reported near record amounts of rain for the month of May.

Kansas State University climatologist Mary Knapp says the Garden City Experiment Station recorded 6.38 inches last month, the fourth wettest May on record. A year ago, the station recorded just 0.63 inch in May.