child care

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Day cares, at a premium in Kansas in non-pandemic times, are essential businesses that can stay open while the state is under a stay-at-home order. Overall, they’re seeing a drop in the number of kids who show up, but want to be there for health care workers.

“The nurses. The doctors. Everybody on the frontlines,” Phillipsburg Child Care Center program director Brooke Feik said. “They need somewhere to take their kiddos.”

GARDEN CITY, Kansas — The census determines more than the number of congressional districts in a state. The number of responses impacts child care, too. 

Eighteen of Kansas’ 105 counties don’t have infant or toddler child care available, according to Child Care Aware Kansas. It uses census data to calculate the state’s child care needs, and every year, the demand grows. 

“Each year it just continues to really become a little bleaker — especially in rural areas,” said Leadell Ediger, executive director of Child Care Aware Kansas. 

Go here to subscribe to the My Fellow Kansans. This season, we look at the prospects of rural places.

PHILLIPSBURG, Kansas — The opening of a child care center attracts little notice in a city or suburb.

In rural Kansas, it’s cause for celebration.

The focus on young families, and the hope that represents, is remarkably rare in small towns fighting for survival against forces largely beyond their control.

macrophile, flickr Creative Commons

A task force is being formed to create a new nonprofit child care center in downtown Wichita.

Board members of the former Downtown Daycare Center are trying to create a new child care option for parents who live or work in the heart of Wichita.

The former center served about 100 infants and children at its site on South Topeka for more than 40 years before it closed in 2014.

To fill the void, board President Betty Moore says they would like to create a centrally located, state-of-the-art child care center, possibly with an indoor play area.

Kansas Officials Say New Law Improves Child Care

Jul 23, 2012

State officials say a law passed two years ago has dramatically improved child care in Kansas.

The 2010 law is known as Lexie’s Law, after a 13-month-old girl who died from injuries she suffered at a Johnson County day care in 2004.

Among other things, it requires training for day care providers. It also requires day cares that take in up to six children to be regularly inspected. In the past, those small day cares were inspected only in response to complaints.