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Marginalia: Dorothy Wickenden on 'The Agitators'

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For this episode of Marginalia, I was joined by Dr. Robin Henry, an associate professor in the history department at Wichita State University where her research examines the intersections among sexuality, law, and regional identity in the 19th- and early 20th-century United States. She is also the host and producer of KMUW's podcast Hindsight: Looking Back At 100 Years Of Women's Suffrage.

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And our special guest was Dorothy Wickenden, who has been executive editor of The New Yorker since 1996. She also writes for the magazine and is host of the weekly podcast, Politics and More. Her first book is titled Nothing Daunted: The Unexpected Education of Two Society Girls in the West. She joined us to talk about her newest book, The Agitators: Three Friends Who Fought for Abolition and Women’s Rights. Here's our conversation.

The Agitators: Three Friends Who Fought for Abolition and Women’s Rights by Dorothy Wickenden was published by Scribner.

Thanks for joining us for Marginalia. If you enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a review.

Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita.

  • Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen - engineers
  • Lu Anne Stephens - editor
  • Haley Crowson - producer
  • Beth Golay - host
  • Dr. Robin Henry - special guest host

Follow Beth Golay on Twitter @BethGolay.

Beth Golay is KMUW's Director of Marketing and Digital Content. She is the host of the KMUW podcast Marginalia and creator of the podcast You're Saying It Wrong. You can also find her on Wichita Transit in conversation with other riders for En Route, a monthly segment on KMUW's weekly news program The Range.
Dr. Robin C. Henry holds a Ph.D. in U.S. history from Indiana University and is an associate professor in the history department at Wichita State University. Her research examines the intersections among sexuality, law, and regional identity in the 19th- and early 20th-century United States.