Stephan Bisaha

News Reporter

Stephan Bisaha covers education and young adult life for KMUW and the Kansas News Service. Before coming to Wichita, he was an NPR Kroc Fellow. Stephan has reported national stories for Morning Edition, All Things Considered and other NPR programs. His work has ranged from analyzing data for an investigation into the Department of Veteran Affairs to the business of emoji pillows.

Stephan was honored with a 2020 Regional Murrow Award in Sports Reporting for Kansas Community College Football Now Has Its Own Stars, Netflix Series And Scandals. He received two honorable mentions, in the sports feature and hard news categories, from the Kansas Association of Broadcasters in 2020, along with second place in news features from the Public Media Journalists Association. His 2019 sports feature, Are Video Games A Sport? Hoping To Attract Fans And Students, Kansas Colleges Say Yes, received second place from the Kansas Association of Broadcasters. Stephan has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism with a concentration in data journalism.
 

Ways to Connect

Crysta Henthorne / For the Kansas News Service

The race to represent the 1st Congressional District is as wide open as its land, with GOP Rep. Roger Marshall running for Senate. On the Republican side, there’s Tracey Mann from Salina, who had a short stint as Kansas' lieutenant governor. Democrats have Kali Barnett, a music teacher from Garden City.

For those still undecided, here’s a look at how the candidates feel about the major issues in this election.

Nicole Grimes / KMUW

Wichita State University held a memorial service at Cessna Stadium on Friday honoring both the victims and survivors of a plane crash 50 years ago.

On Oct. 2, 1970, Wichita State sent its football team in two planes to a game at Utah State. One plane crashed near Silver Plume, Colorado. The crash killed 31 passengers, including 14 players.

Listen: The Pieces That Remain: Remembering The Wichita State Plane Crash

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Former Wichita State University President Jay Golden agreed to limit his presence on campus, move out of his in-campus house by Sunday and stay on the university payroll.

That’s according to a letter the Kansas Board of Regents sent to Jay Golden outlining some of the terms for his resignation. KMUW received the letter Wednesday from the Regents.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW/File photo

Wichita State University President Jay Golden has resigned, according to a statement by the Kansas Board of Regents released Friday.

“We are appreciative of his hard work and dedication to the university and are grateful for his commitment to serving students,” Regents Chair Bill Feuerborn said in the statement. “We wish him well in all his future endeavors.”

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

Zach Zimmer’s roommates at Benedictine College had grown accustomed to seeing him stressed.

But on the first Saturday in September, the college junior got them worried. He was running a temperature of 101.5.

“We knew immediately at that moment,” Zimmer said, “that this could be something more serious.”

Holly Mulcahy

Six months in a pandemic has meant six months of virtual events.

That’s also led to a lot of “Zoom fatigue.”

While in-person events are slowly returning, large gatherings like galas and festivals are still regulated to online-only. Here are four tips from Wichita organizers about how to draw attention in the saturated virtual world:

Public speaking skills

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Universities don’t just sell the chance at an education. The whole college experience has been a key tool for keeping students around.

Wichita State University budgeted more than $1 million dollars on ways for students to have fun on campus last year.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

For the first time since March, at least some Wichita Public Schools students returned to the classroom Tuesday.

But concerns about spreading the coronavirus means school will look a lot different this year. KMUW education reporter Stephan Bisaha spoke with Morning Edition host Jonathan Huber about some of the biggest changes.

How school will look different this year

All middle school and high school students will start the school year learning remotely. But don’t expect virtual classes to be treated like they were in the spring.

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Students at Wichita Public Schools will be able to participate in extracurricular activities after all this fall.

The school board voted 6-1 on Tuesday to allow fall sports and other activities to go forward, a reversal of an earlier decision to cancel both for the first nine weeks of the school year because of the coronavirus.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

WICHITA, Kansas — Some students at public universities in Kansas have, or will yet get, the coronavirus.

Football players training over the summer have tested positive. A frat house in Manhattan has an outbreak. And some dorm students elsewhere in the state have gone from just-unpacked to quarantined.

Schools spent the summer preparing. Desks have been moved six feet apart. In-person classes are getting cut back. Masks must be worn.

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