Stephan Bisaha

News Reporter

Stephan Bisaha is a former NPR Kroc Fellow. Along with producing Weekend Edition, Stephan has reported on national stories for Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as other NPR programs. He provided data analysis for an investigation into the Department of Veteran Affairs and reported on topics ranging from Emojis to mattresses.

Stephan has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and concentrated in data journalism. He currently covers education for KMUW and the Kansas News Service. 

Ways to Connect

Chris Neal / For the Kansas News Service

Kansas universities are looking beyond the Midwest -- as far out as California -- for out-of-state students to fill their classrooms.

But other states are competing just as hard for Kansas students.

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

A college degree is still your best bet for earning top dollar.

Yet with more Americans graduating from college, having a degree is no longer enough to stand out. To make the most of that degree in an economy filled with college grads, choosing the right degree is that much more important. Here are some tips for finding the right college major.

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

Henrion Hall is where the dirty art happens at Wichita State University.

Sculpting. Ceramics. Spray painting. Students are likely to ding, splash and generally make a mess of the walls. With the building nearing 100 years old, the university doesn't mind.

Fernando Salazar / For the Kansas News Service

Jon Hu stepped away from Wichita State University’s engineering career fair with beads of sweat forming on his face.

Students and the employers who might offer them jobs had crammed into a university ballroom. Most were donned — and overheating — in suits in the crowded room.

“I’ve been wearing this suit for about five hours,” Hu said. “So, yeah. It’s very, very hot in this.”

Stephan Bisaha / Kansas News Service

Student Matthew Fitch wanted a low-cost, quick entry into the workforce. That’s all he wanted.

So he transferred from a community college to WSU Tech — a place that felt quieter and more focused on his dash to the working world.

“There’s no parties all the time,” Fitch said. “Everybody’s kind of focused on learning a lot so that they can get a nice job.”

Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

Wichita State University is running a campaign to have students support what they usually oppose: higher fees.

Chris Neal / For the Kansas News Service

A bill in the Kansas Legislature would let students escape bullying by transferring to a new school, either public or private.

But critics say the bill is little more than an attempt to send state dollars meant for public schools to private alternatives.

Brian Grimmett / Kansas News Service/File Photo

Former Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke compared the national economy to a Looney Tunes character: magically floating in the air for a moment after running off a cliff before inevitably plummeting in 2020.

Chris Neal of Shooter Imaging / Kansas News Service

Simplistic crisis plans and missing mandatory training by some Kansas schools led the Kansas Board of Education on Tuesday to reinforce its suicide prevention requirements.

Suicide rates in the United States have been going up for years, but the rates have risen faster in Kansas. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Kansas suicide rate increased by 45 percent from 1999 to 2016.

Stephan Bisaha

Wichita Public Schools Board of Education voted 6-1 to ask the State Board of Education for the authority to raise local tax rates.

The Wichita board called the request a safety net in case the state legislature does not provide the funding the district says it needs.

"I can tell you after five straight years of cutting budgets I'm not going to do it again," said board vice president Mike Rodee. 

If approved, the board would not have to raise the tax rate. But it would have the flexibility to do so if the board feels it's necessary.

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