Deborah Shaar

News Reporter

Award-winning news reporter Deborah Shaar covers Sedgwick County, and produces short and in-depth stories about government, education, health, politics, arts and community topics. She joined the KMUW News team in 2014. Before that, Deborah spent more than a dozen years working in newsrooms at both public and commercial radio and television stations in Ohio, West Virginia and Michigan. She also taught news and broadcasting classes at a Texas college.

Deborah’s reporting has earned prestigious national, regional and state awards for excellence in journalism. She won a national Sigma Delta Chi award from Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) in 2017 for investigative reporting.

Her reporting has earned three regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow awards: in 2018, for hard news and news feature; and in 2016, for investigative reporting.

Since 2015, the Kansas Association of Broadcasters (KAB) has recognized Deborah’s reporting annually with awards in categories such as spot news, hard newsnews featuresports feature and severe weather coverage.

Deborah began her on-air career as a news reporter and anchor at several small market TV stations in southeast Ohio and West Virginia. She fine-tuned her writing and producing skills while working on a highly rated three-hour morning news show at the Fox TV affiliate in Detroit, Michigan.

From there, she leveraged her on-air, writing and producing skills to train and develop broadcast news students at Ohio University for the WOUB radio and television newsroom. As managing editor, Deborah supervised a student-staff that produced a nightly television newscast, and radio stories. A move to central Ohio brought an opportunity for Deborah to work as a fill-in news anchor for a statewide cable TV news network.

Deborah earned Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in journalism from Ohio University. Her master’s thesis is a historical narrative about the transformation of journalism training at the University of Leipzig, Germany, as a result of Germany’s reunification.

Ways to Connect

Carla Eckels

A public ceremony is planned for Friday afternoon in Wichita to mark the 50th anniversary of the Piatt Street plane crash.

As KMUW’s Deborah Shaar reports, Wichita’s mayor issued an official Proclamation during Tuesday’s City Council meeting.

Mayor Carl Brewer designated Friday, January 16, 2015 as the Piatt Street Plane Crash 50th Year Remembrance.

“I call upon the people of Wichita and McConnell Air Force Base to mourn and to give tribute to those who lost their lives," Mayor Brewer says. "To honor those who violently fought the fires to rescue the living.”

Courtesy photo

Wichita is moving forward with plans for a new Central Library and is expected to put the project to bid by end of the year.

City Council approved the next phase Tuesday morning by a vote of five to two.

The city also entered into a new partnership with the Wichita Public Library Foundation, a non-profit, to pay for the upcoming work.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar has more on the council's action and the features visitors may see at the new library.

    

Amy Hopper, flickr Creative Commons

Wichita residents will learn more details about the proposed new Central Library next week. KMUW’s Deborah Shaar has the story.

Leaders from the Wichita Public Library Foundation are expected to present their final report on the design phase to City Council on Tuesday.

Plans call for the new Central library to be built on land near Second and McLean, just southwest of Exploration Place.

The project has been in the works since 2006 and is expected to cost about 30-million.

kansasheart.com, hutchregional.com, sckmc.org, srmcks.org

  

      

Four hospitals in South Central Kansas face a financial penalty for having high rates of infection or patient injuries in recent years.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar reports.

A federal law requires Medicare to grade hospitals for hospital-acquired conditions such as the frequency of central-line blood infections, urinary tract infections or serious patient complications during care.

As a result, 11 hospitals in Kansas had rates too high and will be penalized by having their Medicare reimbursements reduced by one-percent this fiscal year.

http://www.wichita.lib.ks.us

The Wichita Public Library is closing one of its eight branches, as well as moving its collections to other larger branches. KMUW’s Deborah Shaar has the story.

The Orchard Park library branch on West Ninth Street closed for good on Friday because it was no longer meeting the needs of its customers.

Director of Libraries Cynthia Berner says the branch is a very small space inside the Orchard Park Recreation Center and its usage has declined.

Berner says the branch has been a part of the community for 34 years.

Westar Energy is adding to its renewable energy portfolio through a new wind farm, while retiring two older natural gas plants in Wichita. KMUW's Deborah Shaar has the story.

Westar announced Tuesday that it plans to buy wind energy from a new wind farm going up in two western Kansas counties.

The Cedar Bluff wind farm is expected to be running by the end of 2015. It’ll provide Westar with 200 megawatts of electricity.

Deborah Shaar

There are at least fifteen community health clinics in Sedgwick County that serve people in need. They are known as “safety net clinics.”

One of them, the Guadalupe Clinic, will mark its 30th anniversary next year. For the past decade, Guadalupe has been working with students from the KU School of Medicine-Wichita to increase the level of care offered… and provide these future doctors with very practical experience.

Deborah Shaar

Two Wichita non-profits that serve people in need received a special donation this week: gold coins.

The Wichita Community Foundation presented one gold coin to Guadalupe Clinic and two coins to The Lord’s Diner. Each coin is valued at $1,300.

An anonymous donor set up the gold coin program in 2005 with a gift of $100,000.

Mandy A. Riedel

The Wichita Symphony’s youth orchestra program recently wrapped up the fall semester with a concert in downtown Wichita.

More than 200 student musicians from South Central Kansas, ranging in from ages 10 to 18, make up the three orchestras that performed.

This youth orchestra program is the largest of its kind in Kansas and has been inspiring young musicians for 67 years.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar introduces us to the woman who’s been leading the charge for more than two decades.

Reaching Out To Refugees / Facebook

    

A group of students at Wichita State University are providing a helping hand to refugees who have come here to escape war, poverty or natural disasters in their home countries.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar has the story.

The students created a group called "Reaching Out 2 Refugees" to offer tangible support, such as clothing, furniture or toiletries, to the refugees that have resettled in the Wichita area.

WSU senior, Matt Brubaker says one lesson he’s learned is that the community has a lot of needs that go unseen.

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