Deborah Shaar

News Reporter

Award-winning news reporter Deborah Shaar covers Sedgwick County, and produces short and in-depth stories about government, education, health, politics, arts and community topics. She joined the KMUW News team in 2014. Before that, Deborah spent more than a dozen years working in newsrooms at both public and commercial radio and television stations in Ohio, West Virginia and Michigan. She also taught news and broadcasting classes at a Texas college.

Deborah’s reporting has earned prestigious national, regional and state awards for excellence in journalism. She won a national Sigma Delta Chi award from Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) in 2017 for investigative reporting.

Her reporting has earned three regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow awards: in 2018, for hard news and news feature; and in 2016, for investigative reporting.

Since 2015, the Kansas Association of Broadcasters (KAB) has recognized Deborah’s reporting annually with awards in categories such as spot news, hard newsnews featuresports feature and severe weather coverage.

Deborah began her on-air career as a news reporter and anchor at several small market TV stations in southeast Ohio and West Virginia. She fine-tuned her writing and producing skills while working on a highly rated three-hour morning news show at the Fox TV affiliate in Detroit, Michigan.

From there, she leveraged her on-air, writing and producing skills to train and develop broadcast news students at Ohio University for the WOUB radio and television newsroom. As managing editor, Deborah supervised a student-staff that produced a nightly television newscast, and radio stories. A move to central Ohio brought an opportunity for Deborah to work as a fill-in news anchor for a statewide cable TV news network.

Deborah earned Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in journalism from Ohio University. Her master’s thesis is a historical narrative about the transformation of journalism training at the University of Leipzig, Germany, as a result of Germany’s reunification.

Ways to Connect

File Photo

Sedgwick County commissioners plan to ask the governor and health leaders to reconsider an exemption allowing abortion services to continue during the COVID-19 crisis.

Sarah Petty / Facebook

A Sedgwick County man has died from COVID-19 less than a week after he tested positive for the disease.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

  

Sedgwick County has issued a 30-day stay-at-home order to restrict public activity as the coronavirus continues to spread in the community.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

The number of Kansans affected by coronavirus-related work disruptions keeps growing.

Restaurants, businesses and city facilities across the state are adjusting to government restrictions to keep the virus from spreading. That means temporary closings, canceled events and reduced business hours — all changes that directly affect employees.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Sedgwick County announced tighter restrictions on the size of public gatherings Monday to help reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

Until further notice, indoor and outdoor events that bring together 50 or more people are not allowed. The county on Friday had prohibited gatherings of 250 people or more.

Carla Stanfield / Cosmosphere

Two new areas in the Cosmosphere space museum in Hutchinson open to the public next week.

The Cosmosphere created CosmoKids, its first hands-on learning space specifically for young kids ages 2-6.

Museum spokeswoman Carla Stanfield says new murals cover the walls around several interactive STEAM — science, technology, engineering, art and math—activities.

“They’ll be able to build and launch a rocket. They’ll be able to climb in an Orion-style — that’s a circular shaped — space capsule, then they’ll be able to build a Mars habitat,” Stanfield says.

File / U.S. Centers for Disease Control, Wikipedia

Testing for the coronavirus in Kansas has so far been done at the state level, but health leaders say that could change in a few weeks.

Sedgwick County

The Sedgwick County Health Department is stepping up its public awareness campaign on the coronavirus and offering tips to prevent infection.

County Health Director Adrienne Byrne says most people in the Wichita region are at low risk for infection from the coronavirus, which leads to the COVID-19 disease. There are no confirmed cases in Kansas or Sedgwick County yet.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW/File photo

Crisis care in the Wichita area is about to undergo a major overhaul.

A new plan released Thursday lays out the steps to improving mental health and substance abuse services over the next five years.

Senior Airman Skyler Combs / McConnell Air Force Base

McConnell Air Force Base in Wichita says it has increased its safety procedures for personnel who work in an aircraft hangar where a cancer-causing chemical is present.

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