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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Underwater - that is the status again today across a lot of the Midwest. Take Nebraska, where many homes and offices and roads are submerged. People are dragging sandbags, shifting everything they can to higher ground and hoping and waiting for the water to recede. Well, our next guest has had a bird's-eye view of the damage. Major General Daryl Bohac is the head of the Nebraska National Guard. He's been touring the state by helicopter today. General, first of all, welcome and, second of all, where exactly have we caught you?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Underwater - that is the status again today across a lot of the Midwest. Take Nebraska, where many homes and offices and roads are submerged. People are dragging sandbags, shifting everything they can to higher ground and hoping and waiting for the water to recede. Well, our next guest has had a bird's-eye view of the damage. Major General Daryl Bohac is the head of the Nebraska National Guard. He's been touring the state by helicopter today. General, first of all, welcome and, second of all, where exactly have we caught you?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Underwater - that is the status again today across a lot of the Midwest. Take Nebraska, where many homes and offices and roads are submerged. People are dragging sandbags, shifting everything they can to higher ground and hoping and waiting for the water to recede. Well, our next guest has had a bird's-eye view of the damage. Major General Daryl Bohac is the head of the Nebraska National Guard. He's been touring the state by helicopter today. General, first of all, welcome and, second of all, where exactly have we caught you?

Boeing's bestselling jetliner, the 737 Max, has crashed twice in six months — the Lion Air disaster in October and the Ethiopian Airlines crash this month. Nearly 350 people have been killed, and the model of plane has been grounded indefinitely as investigations are underway.

Boeing has maintained the planes are safe. But trust — from the public, from airlines, from pilots and regulators — has been shaken.

So far, experts say, Boeing has mishandled this crisis but has the opportunity to win back confidence in the future.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Underwater - that is the status again today across a lot of the Midwest. Take Nebraska, where many homes and offices and roads are submerged. People are dragging sandbags, shifting everything they can to higher ground and hoping and waiting for the water to recede. Well, our next guest has had a bird's-eye view of the damage. Major General Daryl Bohac is the head of the Nebraska National Guard. He's been touring the state by helicopter today. General, first of all, welcome and, second of all, where exactly have we caught you?

President Trump continues to pile on criticism of the late Sen. John McCain, complaining on Wednesday during a speech in Ohio that the Arizona senator's family never thanked him for the Vietnam War hero's funeral, which involved large ceremonies in Washington, D.C.

"I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as president I had to approve," Trump told a crowd at an Army tank manufacturing plant in Lima. "I don't care about this. I didn't get [a] thank you. That's okay. We sent him on the way, but I wasn't a fan of John McCain."

The European Commission is hitting Google with a fine of 1.49 billion euros (some $1.7 billion) for "abusive practices" in online advertising, saying the search and advertising giant broke the EU's antitrust rules and abused its market dominance by preventing or limiting its rivals from working with companies that had deals with Google. The case revolves around search boxes that are embedded on websites and that display ads brokered by Google.

When Cyclone Idai, a devastating tropical storm, swept across southeastern Africa on Thursday, it killed at least 150 people, displaced hundreds of thousands and left Beira, a coastal city of a half-million people in central Mozambique, almost totally destroyed.

In the aftermath, with some of their neighbors still trapped on rooftops or in trees, some local residents began the long process of recovery with a small but notable rebuttal to nature, by beginning to move the beach back to its rightful place.

The U.S. Supreme Court signaled strongly on Wednesday that it is likely to rule for a death row inmate in Mississippi who was prosecuted six times for the same crime by a prosecutor with a history of racial bias in jury selection.

The arguments, more passionate and fact-filled than usual, also had a surprise ending when Justice Clarence Thomas posed a question — the first time in three years.

Democratic presidential hopefuls are betting on bold.

The majority of the Democrats running for president want to create a national health insurance program. Several want to do away with private health insurance entirely. Candidates are engaging on questions about reparations for slavery, and most of the White House hopefuls have endorsed the goal of a carbon-neutral economy within the next decade.

Increase the size of the U.S. Supreme Court? Several candidates are now on board.

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