Energy & Environment

Kansas Geological Survey

Zack Pistora, legislative director of the Kansas Sierra Club, was worried about the number of earthquakes in the state and wanted to do something about it.

“Those earthquakes can cause damage to people’s homes, businesses, public buildings,” he said. “Right now there’s no recourse for those Kansans who get affected.”

Kansas Department of Health and Environment

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has released an updated fish consumption advisory list for 2018.

Joseph Novak / Flickr / Creative Commons

Wind energy groups are praising the recently passed tax bill for keeping in place the renewable energy production tax credit. 

A recently published study by the University of Kansas is providing new insights into south-central Kansas’ recent increase in earthquake activity. 

Brian Grimmett / KMUW

Water remains a key priority for members of the Kansas Farm Bureau, who approved their 2018 legislative agenda Tuesday.

Luca Sartoni / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas says the Environmental Protection Agency has informed the state that all 105 counties in the state meet the most recent ozone standards.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment said in a news release that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt recently sent a letter to Gov. Sam Brownback saying this is good news for the citizens of Kansas. Pruitt's letter also encouraged the state to continue efforts to maintain air quality that meets the 2015 ground-level ozone standards.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media/File Photo

The tax reform bill passed Nov. 16 by the U.S. House could slow development in the wind energy sector by reopening a two-year-old deal.

One industry leader says they’ll need the Senate in their court to protect their current agreement, which phases out production and investment tax credits through 2020.

Madeline Fox / Kansas News Service

Kansas’ energy-regulating agency will investigate nearly a decade’s worth of permits it granted to oil and gas companies after learning recently that some wells received permits without meeting certain state regulations.

The probe, announced Tuesday, will determine the number of wells approved since 2008 without the companies giving nearby residents accurate information about their rights to protest the wells.

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