teaching licenses

Kansas News Service File Photo

Seven Kansas school districts freed from some state rules now say getting that special status isn’t worth the effort.

Those districts are part of the Kansas Department of Education's "Coalition of Innovative School Districts" program that started in 2013. Districts that join have the freedom to ignore state oversight on some of the ways they run their schools in exchange for pursuing novel approaches for improving student achievement.

Kansas officials say the state is hearing from people interested in new teaching license regulations that would allow some people to teach without having education degrees.

The changes that took effect on Tuesday are aimed at making it easier for people with professional experience to fill teaching vacancies in math, science, technology and engineering.

The Kansas State Board of Education has approved changes that will allow people with career experience -but no education degree- to teach in public schools. As Stephen Koranda reports, the changes will allow people with real-world experience to teach subjects including math, science and technical education.

The new regulations were prompted by a bill passed earlier this year by the Kansas Legislature, although the Board of Ed had already been considering some new rules. The changes easily passed on a 9-1 vote. That majority included board member Steve Roberts.

The Kansas State Board of Education is preparing to approve regulations for implementing a new state law allowing teaching licenses for people with relevant experience but no education degree.

Legislators approved the measure as a way to increase the available pool of teachers in science, math, engineering and technology in secondary schools.

The board has already given the regulations preliminary approval. Final approval at a meeting today is the last step before the law takes effect July 1.

Kansas Board To Revise Teacher Licensing Rules

Sep 17, 2013

The State Board of Education has voted to require all Kansas teachers renewing their licenses to submit fingerprints for checks against a state criminal database.