Marginalia

Marginalia is an on-air commentary and podcast hosted by KMUW's Beth Golay. Episodes feature author interviews, editorial commentary and other marginalia to enhance the reading experience.

Several of Beth's interviews are included each year in NPR's Book Concierge.

The Marginalia podcast is also available through Apple Podcasts and through Google Play.

If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review.

Author Jonathan Miles says that his book, Anatomy of a Miracle,  tells the story of the miraculous recovery of a veteran paralyzed during the war in Afghanistan and the subsequent investigation by the Vatican. But layered upon that, it’s also a story about explanations we use in processing life. And finally, it’s a love story. I recently caught up with Jonathan Miles to talk about Anatomy of a Miracle and it’s many layers. Here's our conversation:

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Anatomy of a Miracle by Jonathan Miles was published by Hogarth.

Marginalia: Brock Clarke

Mar 30, 2018

With the publication of his most recent story collection, The Price of the Haircut, Brock Clarke now has 4 novels and 3 story collections on his list of published works. Punctuated with Clarke’s sardonic humor, the new collection is delightfully dark, yet hopeful at times. 

Murdo Macleod

Irish author Maggie O’Farrell is best known for her fiction, with a half-dozen novels on her bibliography. But her newest work is non-fiction: a collection of essays about her brushes with death.

Marginalia: Ben Dolnick

Mar 9, 2018
Todd Heisler

Ben Dolnick’s new book, The Ghost Notebooks, follows a young couple--Nick & Hannah--as they move from New York City to a historic home turned museum in upstate New York. The book--and their lives--seem pretty straight forward, until the Hannah begins hearing voices. She’d had a history of mental illness, but the couple didn’t believe her behavior since the move could be attributed to any past illnesses. Something else was off. And area neighbors knew it, too.

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

A conversation with Charles Finch about his work as an author and a critic.

Michael Lionstar

Charles C. Mann has written about the intersection of science, technology, and commerce for many newspapers, magazines and books. His latest book, The Wizard and the Prophet, is about two scientists and their dueling predictions about the future of our planet. 

Marginalia: Jojo Moyes

Feb 2, 2018

When Jojo Moyes wrote Me Before You in 2012, she wasn’t expecting to write a follow-up. But the unlikely heroine of that book, Louisa Clark, just wouldn’t leave her. So Moyes penned After You, which was published in 2015. Louisa Clark kept speaking to her, so Moyes wrote Still Me, which hit the shelves this week.

Jojo Moyes is on tour this week, but I caught up with her via phone to talk about the unplanned series, her research, and what she’s working on next. Here’s our conversation:

And here's the shorter commentary from on-air:

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Marginalia: Peter Heller

Jan 26, 2018
John Burcham

Peter Heller’s book, Celine, is a book about a private eye who is anything but typical. She’s 68 years old, part of the New York aristocracy, is highly educated, and her petite and sophisticated form can barely peer over a steering wheel. And she not entirely fictional. The character Celine is very much based on Peter Heller’s mother. 

The book was recently released in paperback, and I caught up with Heller to visit about the book, his mother, the writing process, and what’s next.  Here’s our conversation:     

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Chloe Benjamin’s new book, The Immortalists, begins in the 1960s, with four siblings, aged 7 to 13, visiting a Romani fortune teller on New York’s lower east side. Each sibling is granted an individual audience with the fortune teller, and each is told the date they will die.

The novel then follows the siblings through their decades, punctuated with invisible question marks, and an unspoken debate about destiny vs. choice.

Marginalia: Megan Hunter

Jan 12, 2018

A conversation with Megan Hunter, author of The End We Start From.

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