highways

When Kansas State University Professor Sunanda Dissanayake and other researchers studied traffic fatalities in Kansas, they expected to find that more people had died on the roads.

After all, the state had increased speed limits on some highways to 75 miles per hour. Higher speeds lead to more severe crashes. But they did not expect such a deadly result.

Matthew Hodapp / KCUR/File photo

President Donald Trump unveiled a $1.5 trillion infrastructure proposal on Monday built on plans that would more heavily rely on state and local dollars being matched with money from Washington.

Kansas Department of Transportation

Planning to use Kellogg near I-235 the first weekend of January? Better find an alternate route.

Weather permitting, the Kansas Department of Transportation plans to close all traffic on Kellogg under I-235 from Friday, Jan. 5, through Monday, Jan. 8. All traffic on I-235 over Kellogg also will be closed during that period.

Crews plan to install steel beams for the northbound I-235 ramp leading to westbound Kellogg.

KDOT Begins 25th Street Bridge Demolition

Feb 24, 2017
http://www.wichway.org

Beginning Friday, the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) will be demolishing a bridge that passes over I-235 in northwest Wichita.

The demolition of the 25th Street bridge over I-235 is set to be completed by 6 a.m. on Monday. The work is part of a nearly $20 million project which will include the rebuilding of five bridges that pass over I-235.

KDOT says I-235 traffic will be rerouted through the area. Traffic will be reduced to a single lane, and existing ramps will be used to avoid the project.

East Kellogg / Twitter

A major interchange on East Kellogg is scheduled to close on Monday for four years. KMUW's Carla Eckels says it's the next phase of an ongoing project.

The Kansas Department of Transportation plans to close the ramp where eastbound K-96 joins westbound Kellogg until the year 2021.

Spokesperson Tom Hein says the ramp closure will allow several segments of the Kellogg freeway in that general area to be constructed.

Study Gives Kansas Roads High Marks

Sep 16, 2016
Doug Kerr / Flickr Creative Commons

A study by the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) says 96.7 percent of interstate highways and 91.7 percent of non-interstate highways in the state were ranked as "good" in the fiscal year ending in July.

To figure out the rating, the department evaluates the state's 10,000-mile highway system annually and gives marks based on scores of surface roughness and distress. KDOT says it aims for 85 percent of interstate highways and 80 percent of non-interstate highways to be rated as good. This year's rankings were higher than that.

John Russell, flickr Creative Commons

Recently released data shows U.S. driving is up 3.3 percent for the first six months of 2016, the number is even higher in Kansas.

Travel on the state highway system in Kansas is up 3.6 percent over where it was in 2015.

Ann Williamson with the Kansas Department of Transportation says it’s a good sign for travelers.

Andy Marso / KHI News Service

Every election season, there are stories about issues. This is one of those stories. The issue: roads.

A state Senate race in Pittsburg, Kansas, is one where the issue of roads--and whether or not they get built--could be pivotal.

Andy Marso / KHI News Service

A Kansas senator says a highway project in his district is back on schedule, drawing protests from Democrats who say Republican Gov. Sam Brownback picked that project over others to help a political ally in an election year.

The project to widen U.S. Highway 69 north of Pittsburg from two lanes to four was one of 25 delayed in April to help balance the state budget.

It sits in the district of Republican Sen. Jake LaTurner, who sent an open letter to Brownback decrying the delay.

Doug Kerr, flickr Creative Commons

Gov. Sam Brownback’s three options for balancing the state budget include taking about $185 million from the highway fund.

As a result, the Kansas Department of Transportation is holding off on 25 major projects, including two in Reno and Harvey counties.

Fourteen projects will be delayed in fiscal year 2017 at an estimated construction cost of $271 million; 9 projects are on hold in the fiscal year 2018 at an estimated construction cost of $247 million; and two projects are on hold in fiscal year 2019 at an estimated construction cost of $35 million.

Pages