gun laws

The Kansas Attorney General’s office said that applications for concealed carry licenses continue to decline.

About 4,900 new license applications were submitted to the state Concealed Carry Licensing Unit in the 2018 fiscal year. That’s the lowest total since the licensing program began in 2006.

The Personal and Family Protection Act, enacted in 2015, allows eligible individuals over age 21 in Kansas to carry a concealed weapon without a license.

A pro-gun rally on the south side of the Kansas Statehouse drew about 200 people to Topeka on Friday morning as students around the country walked out of class to protest gun violence.

The rally was organized by the Kansas State Rifle Association and the NRA.

Speakers repeated familiar slogans, arguing that "only a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun," that progressives want to repeal the Second Amendment, and that if people are old enough to serve in the military, they're old enough to conceal carry.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Even in the wake of national and local protests, students and others pushing for tighter gun laws say state and federal lawmakers from Kansas refuse to tackle even “common sense” firearm rules.

Thousands rallied across the state over the weekend. They called for stronger background checks. They pushed an assault weapons ban. And they pleaded for laws to extract guns from homes where suicide and domestic violence appear imminent.

Kansas News Service/File photo

A Kansas bill that would make it a crime for people recently convicted of a misdemeanor domestic violence offense to have a firearm has stalled in the state Senate.

The bill unanimously passed the House last month but has stalled after the Senate's Federal and State Affairs Committee amended language regarding silencers and throwing stars, The Kansas City Star reported.

File Photo / publicdomainpictures.net

Listening to news reports while driving to the Statehouse on the day after the deadly high school shooting in Florida, Kansas Sen. Barbara Bollier decided to redouble her efforts to put a “red flag” law on the books in Kansas.

She wants a system for temporarily confiscating guns from people deemed a risk to themselves or others.

“It’s not something that tramples on somebody’s rights,” said Bollier, a Mission Hills Republican. “It just puts a temporary hold on a situation until things calm down.”

Wichita East High School / Facebook

Alayna Nelson, a sophomore at Wichita Northwest High School, grew up hearing stories of repeated mass shootings on the news.

“Every single time this happened I always wanted to do something about it,” Nelson said.

Now, Nelson and other students in her generation are taking action against gun violence.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers have rejected an effort to repeal a law that allows people to carry concealed firearms in most facilities at public colleges and universities in the state.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that the Kansas House voted 53-69 against Democratic Rep. Barbara Ballard's repeal amendment Thursday.

Storem / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas House advanced a bill that will allow people as young as 18 to carry concealed weapons.

Currently only those 21 and older can carry concealed weapons. The new law would require those between 18 and 21 to get a gun permit, which is not required after age 21.

The bill advanced Thursday by a vote of 85-35 and could come to a final vote Friday.

Storem / flickr Creative Commons

The start of July means the start of two new policies that affect students and employees at Wichita State University.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

It took 113 days instead of the scheduled 100, but Kansas lawmakers finally ended their 2017 session Saturday.

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